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Crimea: What's next for people in the disputed region?




Pro-Russian marchers (foreground) walk past pro-Ukrainian marchers gathered in Simferopol, capital of Ukraine's Crimea region, Saturday. Several hundred pro-Ukrainian protesters marched peacefully through the city center to a Ukrainian military base that's been blockaded by pro-Russian militants and soldiers.
Pro-Russian marchers (foreground) walk past pro-Ukrainian marchers gathered in Simferopol, capital of Ukraine's Crimea region, Saturday. Several hundred pro-Ukrainian protesters marched peacefully through the city center to a Ukrainian military base that's been blockaded by pro-Russian militants and soldiers.
Sean Gallup/Getty Images

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Well the disputed region of Crimea will be part of Russia. At least that's according to a defiant Vladimir Putin today who attended a signing ceremony with Crimean officials and addressed the Russian Parliament. Both the US and European Union have not recognized a controversial vote Sunday and have announced more sanctions against Russia.

But what's next for Crimea?

As debate continues at the diplomatic level, we take a look at some of the practical considerations of redrawing the borders of the contested region.What would a change of status actually mean to the place and the people on the ground? For more we turn to John Agnew, political geographer at UCLA.