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How neuroscience is helping UC Riverside baseball




UC Riverside center fielder Devyn Bolasky during batting practice. Bolasky trained with Ultimeyes during the 2013 season.
UC Riverside center fielder Devyn Bolasky during batting practice. Bolasky trained with Ultimeyes during the 2013 season.
Sanden Totten / KPCC
UC Riverside center fielder Devyn Bolasky during batting practice. Bolasky trained with Ultimeyes during the 2013 season.
The UC Riverside Highlanders have been working with psychologist Aaron Seitz for two seasons now. Head coach Doug Smith says he doesn't understand the science, but he sees a difference in his players.
Sanden Totten / KPCC
UC Riverside center fielder Devyn Bolasky during batting practice. Bolasky trained with Ultimeyes during the 2013 season.
Players practicing their bunt at the UC Highlander's field.
Sanden Totten / KPCC
UC Riverside center fielder Devyn Bolasky during batting practice. Bolasky trained with Ultimeyes during the 2013 season.
A duffle bag hangs in the Highlander's dugout.
Sanden Totten / KPCC
UC Riverside center fielder Devyn Bolasky during batting practice. Bolasky trained with Ultimeyes during the 2013 season.
Head baseball coach Doug Smith says he's an old school guy but he believes newly developed brain-games may soon catch on in professional sports.
Sanden Totten / KPCC
UC Riverside center fielder Devyn Bolasky during batting practice. Bolasky trained with Ultimeyes during the 2013 season.
UC psychology professor Aaron Seitz says he's been developing the ideas behind Ultimeyes for around a decade. The game debuted in 2011.
Sanden Totten / KPCC


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Now that baseball season is getting underway, teams are restarting the use of statistics to figure out their optimum match-ups. KPCC's Sanden Totten says there's a different approach at UC Riverside, where the baseball team is turning to neuroscience.