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How the fundraising game will change after the Supreme Court's McCutcheon decision

Supreme Court Campaign Finance

Susan Walsh/AP

Republican activist Shaun McCutcheon of Hoover, Ala., center, leaves the Supreme Court in Washington, Tuesday, Oct. 8, 2013, after the court's hearing on campaign finance. The Supreme Court lifted limits on contributions by the biggest individual donors to political campaigns on April 2, 2014. McCutcheon, the national Republican Party and Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky. wanted the court to overturn the overall limits on what contributors may give in a two-year federal election cycle.

A recent Supreme Court decision has opened the door for a lot more money to flow into political campaigns.

The Republican Party launched a super committee to accept huge donations made possible by the McCutcheon versus the Federal Election Commission ruling.

So which party stands to benefit most by this change in law?

Joining us to explain are political strategists Mike Shimpock, who works for the California Democrats like Congressman Adam Schiff and Congresswoman Judy Chu, and Reed Galen, a Republican political consultant and former campaign manager for John McCain and Arnold Schwarzenegger.


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