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How the sharing economy has rationalized our trust in strangers




 A Lyft customer gets into a car on January 21, 2014 in San Francisco, California. As ridesharing services like Lyft, Uber and Sidecar become more popular, the San Francisco Cab Driver Association is reporting that nearly one third of San Francisco's licensed taxi drivers have stopped driving taxis and have started to drive for the ridesharing services.
A Lyft customer gets into a car on January 21, 2014 in San Francisco, California. As ridesharing services like Lyft, Uber and Sidecar become more popular, the San Francisco Cab Driver Association is reporting that nearly one third of San Francisco's licensed taxi drivers have stopped driving taxis and have started to drive for the ridesharing services.
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

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Today, in the United States, people are allowing strangers into their homes and cars more than ever. They're allowing them to borrow their most prized possessions and sometimes even take care of their pets while they're away.

The sharing economy, comprised of companies like Uber, Lyft, Airbnb and others, has changed the way we do business. It's also changed how much we're willing to trust our fellow man.

Jason Tanz is the Executive Editor of WIRED Magazine and joins us to talk about his article, "How Airbnb and Lyft Finally Got Americans to Trust Each Other."