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In surpassing whites, Latino plurality points to California's historic trends

A group of children visit the Avila Adobe, the oldest existing house in Los Angeles, Calif. When the house built in the early 19th century, the state had a large population of Spanish descendants.

Gabriel Bouys/AFP/Getty Images

A group of children visit the Avila Adobe, the oldest existing house in Los Angeles, Calif. When the house built in the early 19th century, the state had a large population of Spanish descendants.

In California, Latinos are now the largest population group in the state. That's according to projections from experts, who say 39 percent of Californians are Latino, surpassing non-Latino whites.

Those projections still need to be borne out by hard evidence, but if they turn out to be correct, the shift will be something of a back to the future moment for California.

We're joined by Leslie Berestein Rojas, KPCC's Immigration and Emerging Communities Reporter.

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