Northern Iraq, remembering Robin Williams, and examining Ebola

How drugs and vaccines get approved is often a business, not medical, process

GUINEA-WAFRICA-HEALTH-EPIDEMIC-EBOLA

CELLOU BINANI/AFP/Getty Images

A picture taken on June 28, 2014 shows a member of Doctors Without Borders (MSF) putting on protective gear at the isolation ward of the Donka Hospital in Conakry, where people infected with the Ebola virus are being treated.

The race to develop a vaccine for the Ebola virus might conjure up an image of doctors and drug makers rushing furiously out of good will to find a treatment.

But in reality, how drugs make it past research and development into the hands of aid workers is, well, much more of a business transaction.

Kenneth Kaitin, professor and director of the Tufts Center for Drug Development at the Tufts School of Medicine, joins Take Two to explain the economic motivations that bring many drugs to market.


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