News and culture through the lens of Southern California.
Hosted by A Martínez
Airs Weekdays 9 to 10 a.m.

LA high-rises no longer require helipads




Birds fly across the sky at daybreak over the downtown Los Angeles skyline on December 14, 2011.
Birds fly across the sky at daybreak over the downtown Los Angeles skyline on December 14, 2011.
FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images

Listen to story

03:59
Download this story 1.0MB

With a decades-old helipad law repealed, Los Angeles could see some unique concepts in its skyline.

It used to be that new high-rises in Los Angeles were required to be built with a helipad on the roof so emergency personnel have easy access to the building. 

Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti, Councilmember José Huizar and the LA Fire Department announced this week they will repeal that law.

Los Angeles was the only major American city to have such a rule on the books. Garcetti says architects can now make interesting buildings that might one day rival iconic skyscrapers like New York City's Chrysler Building.

LA Times architecture critic Christopher Hawthorne explains why the law fell, and what could be on the skyline's horizon.