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New exhibit shows how immigrants fled Nazi Europe and created film noir classics




A studio publicity photo of actors Humphrey Bogart and Ingrid Bergman in a scene from the 1943 classic film
A studio publicity photo of actors Humphrey Bogart and Ingrid Bergman in a scene from the 1943 classic film "Casablanca."
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Let's go back in time to an older, golden age of Hollywood:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=46pQwwF8uww

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZKdcYnlkhx8

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jMTT0LW0M_Y

Those were scenes from "Casablanca," "Double Indemnity" and "Sunset Boulevard."

These movies share more than just the distinction of being great films.

All three were made with huge contributions from European immigrants - many of them Jewish  - who fled their home countries as the Nazis rose to power.

Their stories are the subject of a new exhibition at the Skirball Cultural Center titled "Light And Noir: Exiles and Émigrés in Hollywood, 1933–1950."

Alex Cohen recently stopped by for a tour.