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'El Chapo' escape a 'PR disaster' for Mexican government

Mexico's most powerful drug lord, Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman Loera, escaped from a high-security prison over the weekend for the second time in 15 years — and less than eighteen months after his re-arrest.

A massive manhunt is now underway for the long-time head of Sinaloa's violent drug cartel.

Mexico's National Security Commission said in a statement that "El Chapo" was last seen entering a prison shower area Saturday night. When he was not seen for some time, officials checked his cell and found it empty. A mile-long tunnel leading from the shower area to a nearby construction site was later discovered.

The kingpin's second prison escape is an embarrassment for Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto.

Shortly after Guzman was re-captured in 2014 after more than a decade on the run, Peña Nieto said in an interview that it would be "unforgivable" for the federal government to allow him to escape again.

The Mexican President issued a statement on Sunday calling Guzman's latest escape "an affront to the Mexican state."

For more on the escape and what it means for the Peña Nieto administration, Los Angeles Times’ Mexico Bureau Chief Tracy Wilkinson joined Take Two. She called Guzman's prison break a "PR disaster" for the Mexican government.

To listen to Take Two's entire interview with Tracy Wilkinson, please click on the audio player above.