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Peeple, Yelp for humans: App for 'horrible people'




A security gap on Android, the most popular smartphone operating system, was discovered by security experts in a lab and is so far not widely exploited.
A security gap on Android, the most popular smartphone operating system, was discovered by security experts in a lab and is so far not widely exploited.
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Maybe you've written a review for a restaurant or hotel you loved - or hated. Well, now you can do that for your friend - or enemy.

There's a new app, dubbed "Yelp for humans." It's called Peeple, and it's set to launch later this year.

What could possibly go wrong?

Despite its controversial purpose, the app has managed to secure funding from several Silicon Valley venture capitalists. Shares of the company are currently valued at about $7.6 million dollars.

Ashley Esqueda, the host of CNet’s Tomorrow Daily, stopped by Take Two to explain how it works.

“Let’s say you have a friend who had a terrible experience with an ex-boyfriend and they go on to Peeple,” she says. “Even if the ex-boyfriend doesn’t have a profile, they can write up a terrible review of them and say ‘this guy is a cheating jerk and I hate him and he wronged me,’ and they can submit that to Peeple.”

And therein lies the rub, says Esqueda. Even if hypothetical “ex-boyfriend” didn’t opt-in, the negative review will be out there for the world to see.

“And there isn’t really a way to opt-out either, “ she says.

So, who would use this kind of service? Esqueda says, probably not the type of people you want to be friends with.

“This seems like an app for absolutely horrible people,” she says. “This particular app -- it just seems like a really good vehicle for bullying people … This really seems like an app designed to make people feel awful.”

The app will come with a handful of features aimed at preventing slander and bullying. Users will have needed to be on Facebook for six months. Once you become a user, you’re given the ability to dispute negative reviews before they’re posted. Esqueda says these "protections" won’t do much, though.

“If I’m in for the long revenge -- the long game -- I could go on and make a profile that says ‘Mary Smith,’ and ostensibly -- six months later  -- start writing bad reviews about people that I don’t like anonymously,” she says.

Press the blue play button above to hear more.

Would you use the Peeple app? Tweet your thoughts @TakeTwo.