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Impatient: Are 'low-risk' C-sections happening when they shouldn't be?




In this file photograph taken on March 20, 2007, a two-week-old boy finds his feet in his new world.   (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
In this file photograph taken on March 20, 2007, a two-week-old boy finds his feet in his new world. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
Christopher Furlong/Getty Images

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According to the latest numbers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, nearly a third of all births in this country happen by Cesarean section. 

C-sections can be life-saving procedures for both moms and babies,  but they're not without risks. That's why public health experts say they should only be performed when truly necessary.
Those same experts also say, in far too many cases, C-sections are happening when they aren't really needed. A new study looks at just how often these so-called "low-risk" operations occur.

Southern California Public Radio's health reporter Rebecca Plevin joined host Alex Cohen with more. You can also get more information at her blog.