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The history of Japan and South Korea's dispute over 'comfort women'




Ok-Seon Lee, 87, is one of 54 surviving 'comfort women' in Korea, according to the Korean-American Forum of California.
Ok-Seon Lee, 87, is one of 54 surviving 'comfort women' in Korea, according to the Korean-American Forum of California.
Josie Huang/KPCC

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Today, the foreign ministers of Japan and South Korea announced that they had reached an agreement to end their dispute over Korean women forced to serve as sex slaves for Japan's Imperial Army.

As part of the deal, Japan made an apology and promised a payment of $8.3 million dollars to an organization that the South Korean government will form to provide services to former "comfort women."

Alexis Dudden, professor of history at the University of Connecticut, joined Take Two to discuss the history of the decades-long dispute between the two countries.

To hear the full interview with Alexis Dudden, click the link above.