News and culture through the lens of Southern California.
Hosted by A Martínez
Airs Weekdays 9 to 10 a.m.

The 2016 Oscar awards show re-cap




Actress Julianne Moore (R) present the Oscar to Actor Leonardo DiCaprio for Best Actor in The Revenant on stage at the 88th Oscars on February 28, 2016 in Hollywood, California. AFP PHOTO / MARK RALSTON / AFP / MARK RALSTON        (Photo credit should read MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images)
Actress Julianne Moore (R) present the Oscar to Actor Leonardo DiCaprio for Best Actor in The Revenant on stage at the 88th Oscars on February 28, 2016 in Hollywood, California. AFP PHOTO / MARK RALSTON / AFP / MARK RALSTON (Photo credit should read MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images)
MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images

Listen to story

09:51
Download this story 4.0MB

The 88th annual Academy Awards has given us plenty to talk about:

Chris Rock makes a room full of white people squirmy and doesn't let up.

Leonardo DiCaprio becomes the king of the world by finally winning the Oscar.

And investigative journalism gets the golden Spotlight.

We are all in the Oscars afterglow and the LA Times Rebecca Keegan joined the show to break it all down.

Other highlights from the show:

Mark Rylance beating out Sly Stallone, Mark Ruffalo, Christian Bale and Tom Hardy for Best Supporting Actor.

It was one of the biggest upsets of the night and the internet was abuzz about Sly Stallone's snub:

https://twitter.com/theframe/status/704147320854568960

Alejandro González Iñárritu refuses to be played off

The show really tried to control the length of acceptance speeches by having the orchestra play them off. Now, they really tried when Iñárritu, who won for best director for Revenant but he wasn't stopping.

He started off his speech by thanking stars Leonardo DiCaprio and Tom Hardy. Just as he was thanking cinematographer Emmanuel "Chivo" Lubezki the music began to play and get louder, but Iñárritu pushed on, concluding:

“I am very lucky to be here tonight, but unfortunately, many others haven’t had the same luck. There is a line in the film that [Glass says] to his mixed-race son, ‘They don’t listen to you, they just see the color of your skin. So what a great opportunity to our generation to really liberate ourselves from all prejudice and, you know, this tribal thinking, and make sure for once and forever that the color of the skin become as irrelevant as the length of our hair.”

How do we the Academy avoid another #OscarSoWhite

The countdown is now on for when next year's list of nominees is announced. What happens if there is a repeat of #OscarsSoWhite? The controversy is fresh but the movie making process is slow. Is there enough time for the next batch of nominees to be more diverse? It's not looking good, LA Times found the Academy is still 91% white after four years of a diversity drive. 

To hear the full interview, press the blue play button above.