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Assemblywoman hopes to streamline records of officer involved shootings




ANAHEIM, CA - JULY 29:  A line of police officers guard the Anaheim Police Department before a protest to show outrage for the several recent officer-involved shootings on July 29, 2012 in Anaheim, California. For the past week, protesters have clashed with police resulting in both property damage and many arrests.  (Photo by Jonathan Gibby/Getty Images)
ANAHEIM, CA - JULY 29: A line of police officers guard the Anaheim Police Department before a protest to show outrage for the several recent officer-involved shootings on July 29, 2012 in Anaheim, California. For the past week, protesters have clashed with police resulting in both property damage and many arrests. (Photo by Jonathan Gibby/Getty Images)
Jonathan Gibby/Getty Images

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Last year, KPCC recently conducted an in-depth investigation into officer-involved shootings in Los Angeles County.

We published a database to give the public a better sense of who cops are shooting at and how often... because there is no county-wide database available to the public.

Nor is there any statewide tracking of officer involved shootings that people can peruse.

But one local lawmaker hopes to change that... 

Democratic Assemblywoman Jacqui Irwin of the 44th district of California joined Take Two's Alex Cohen to explain.

On how this system compares to the current way that reports are filed.

For the past 61 years local law enforcement agencies have been required to track and shoot any criminal justice issues and statistics to the Department of Justic.  Then the state compiles that information into an annual report called Crime in California which until recently had been a static document. And it was not really accessible  to the public.

Last year the state att. gen created the open justice initiative. It was basically to get all this information into an easy to use database so that the public can interact with it. But it covers many different types of statistics. [This includes] crime stats, jail data... This just makes it more transparent to the public.

On the concerns officers may have about revealing information that may harm their investigation 

This bill is not deciding that policy of what should be released and what should not be released. This is information that is already required. There's certain information that does need to be kept private. This is really what I look at as a good government bill. That's information that has already been decided by law enforcement and by policy-makers that should be made public is submitted in electronic form so that the public can see it. It really is nothing more than that.

Click here to hear more conversations on Take Two regarding officer involved shootings

To hear the full audio, click the blue player above.