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LADWP says Watts's dingy water is safe to drink




Tap water fills a glass on February 26, 2014 in the French southern city of Marseille. AFP PHOTO/ANNE-CHRISTINE POUJOULAT (Photo credit should read ANNE-CHRISTINE POUJOULAT/AFP/Getty Images)
Tap water fills a glass on February 26, 2014 in the French southern city of Marseille. AFP PHOTO/ANNE-CHRISTINE POUJOULAT (Photo credit should read ANNE-CHRISTINE POUJOULAT/AFP/Getty Images)
Anne-Christine Poujoulat/AFP/Getty Images

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Residents in Watts say the water coming out of the taps is many colors -- brown, yellow, beige -- but not clear. 

The Los Angeles Department of Water and Power is investigiating the complaints.

"In the last about ten days we got a call from LA Unified School District that they had some pretty dirty water showing up," said Marty Adams, director of Water Operations at LADWP, to Take Two's A Martinez.

These complaints prompted testing of the water to determine if it was safe to consume."The water came back as meeting drinking water standards in terms of being clean and safe to drink," Adams said.

Still the cloudiness and discoloration in the tap continues. Adams attributes that to some sediment build up, the result of resting in the pipes. 

"It is technically safe to drink. No one's get sick from drinking it. But it's not what we'd want to serve our customers by any stretch," Adams said.

As part of their investigation, Adams said that LADWP will be purging the supply in an act called "extreme flushing." "We're going to flush the entire system to make sure we get all the sediments out of there," Adams said. The flushing will begin way back at the source area to achieve maximum effect.

In the meantime, Adams wants to assure its customers in the area that they are working as hard as they can to get the tap water back to normal.

"We've got all hands on deck right now," Adams said. "It's priority number one for everyone in the water system to make sure that the water pipes in that area are cleaned of all those sediments and we track down the source of this problem so that it doesn't reoccur." 

To hear the full conversation, click the blue player above