Take Two®

News and culture through the lens of Southern California. Hosted by A Martínez

Law enforcement affiliates discuss how to move forward after Dallas

by Julian Burrell and A Martínez | Take Two®

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DALLAS, TX - JULY 7: Dallas police stand watch near the scene where four Dallas police officers were shot and killed on July 7, 2016 in Dallas, Texas. According to reports, shots were fired during a protest being held in downtown Dallas in response to recent fatal shootings of two black men by police - Alton Sterling on July 5, 2016 in Baton Rouge, Louisiana and Philando Castile on July 6, 2016, in Falcon Heights, Minnesota. (Photo by Ron Jenkins/Getty Images) Ron Jenkins/Getty Images

The country is still reeling after the events in Dallas, Texas, that left five police officers dead and seven wounded.

Micah Xavier Johnson has been identified as the man responsible for carrying out the sniper assault.

We wanted understand how the law enforcement officers are reacting to the sniper attack in Dallas - and how they are trying to carry on.

First Take Two's A Martinez spoke with Los Angeles County Sheriff Jim McDonnell. In addition to today's events his department has also had to deal with two of its officers being wounded in a shooting last week.

On his reaction to the shooting in Dallas

Yeah that's very troubling. If you're surprised and you have somebody with the benefit of a long rifle capability and high ground position, it is difficult to anticipate what's going to happen.

On what types of conversations he's having with his deputies

[A conversation] of thanks to them for their calm demeanor, the way they've handled it. They're professionalism. And the fact that they go to work knowing that these kind of threats  exist but yet they continue to put themselves between danger and the public that we serve.

On why he decided to have his deputies ride in pairs last night

We live in a society where now, with social media and everything, things go viral quickly. What happens in one location can be replicated in another by a copycat. Or there could be a network or a series of cells that are looking to carry out something that'd be more widespread. At the time we did not have any intelligence to indicate that was the case, but out of an abundance of caution we wanted to be able to protect our folks as well as the public.

Martinez also spoke with  Greg Meyer, retired captain with the Los Angeles Police Department for further insight as to how an incident like Dallas can inform how police officer approaches his job.

To hear the full conversation, click the blue player above.

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