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They're up for your vote: LA Community College District Board of Trustees




Some of the campuses that make up the large LA Community College District, reflected on a window in Los Angeles, Calif., Monday, October 1, 2012. Three positions on the Board of Trustees are up for votes this Tuesday.
Some of the campuses that make up the large LA Community College District, reflected on a window in Los Angeles, Calif., Monday, October 1, 2012. Three positions on the Board of Trustees are up for votes this Tuesday.
Anibal Ortiz / KPCC

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This Tuesday, March 7th, voters in L.A. will be choosing candidates to fill the Los Angeles Community College District’s board of trustees.

The board oversees 9 colleges which serve more than 230,000 students, annually.

But, what do the trustees do and how long do they serve? And what are the top issues they’re facing today?

First, let's get to know the candidates: 

Member, Board of Trustees, Seat 2 

Member, Board of Trustees, Seat 4 

Member, Board of Trustees, Seat 6 

For more on the Los Angeles Community College District’s board of trustees., Take Two's A Martinez spoke with Cecilia Rios-Aguilar, Director for the Higher Education Research Institute at UCLA.

Interview Highlights 

"Their primary responsibility is to ensure the viability and the sustainability of the college," said Rios-Aguilar of the role that trustees play. "This means that they monitor accreditation standards, make sure the colleges align their policies to meet those standards and goals, and they are really the direct connection between the community and the college."

The trustees will face many important issues in the coming year, including improving the success of a growing and diverse student body.

"We have the nation's largest district and completion and transfer rates are still pretty low," said Rios-Aguilar. "So the board is going to have to make some decisions and some resolutions as to how they're going to tackle this problem."

They could also look at issues related to construction bids, employment contracts, hiring of top administrative officials and policies that affect undocumented students, said Rios-Aguilar.

To listen to the full interview, click on the blue Media Player above.