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Youth sports has become a $15 billion industry-- and looks a little like the professional sports industry




King-Riley Owens, 9, takes a shot from the free throw line at the American Sports Center in Anaheim. Owens is ranked as a five-star basketball recruit by the National Youth Basketball Report.
King-Riley Owens, 9, takes a shot from the free throw line at the American Sports Center in Anaheim. Owens is ranked as a five-star basketball recruit by the National Youth Basketball Report.
Courtesy of Robbie Pittman Owens

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How early is too early to start treating young athletes like professionals? When they're in college or high school? How about middle, or elementary school-- or even younger? 

The youth sports industry, valued at $15 billion, is forcing parents to think about that question more and more.

Sean Gregory is a senior writer with Time magazine; he's written about the sudden growth of the kids' sports industry, and how it's affecting families. These include families like Brandon Owens'. Owens lives in LA, and his nine-year old son, King-Riley Owens, is rated as a five-star recruit by the National Youth Basketball Report. 

Take Two host A Martínez spoke with Gregory and Owens about the changes in the youth sports industry. To listen to the full interview, use the blue media player above.