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How strength in numbers can help California's DACA lawsuit




California Attorney General Xavier Becerra plans to file a separate lawsuit because a quarter of DACA recipients are California residents, his office says. Here, he is shown updating reporters on status of
California Attorney General Xavier Becerra plans to file a separate lawsuit because a quarter of DACA recipients are California residents, his office says. Here, he is shown updating reporters on status of "Gang of Seven" immigration bill.
Kitty Felde/KPCC

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California is taking on the Trump administration in the courts — again.

State Attorney General Xavier Becerra filed a lawsuit Monday over President Trump's decision to end the DACA program. Minnesota, Maine, and Maryland have also signed onto the action. 

The suit alleges the administration violated recipients' right to due process. 

California joins 15 other states (along with Washington, D.C.) who have joined to bring legal challenges to the DACA decision. 

UCLA professor of constitutional law Adam Winkler says when states file separately, there could be power in numbers:

This is not uncommon. With the travel ban, we saw a lawsuit that was filed on the East Coast. We saw some that were filed on the West Coast. Part of this is that the courts have allowed a single federal district court judge to enter in an injunction that stops a law from applying nationwide. And this was a relatively new development. That's what happened to the Obama administration, and we see that the states want to bring a few different suits in a few different courts, so they're perhaps more likely to get a judge to side with them. 

Press the blue play button above to hear Adam Winkler's analysis of the suit.