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Sphinx head from DeMille's 'Ten Commandments' unearthed in Santa Barbara Dunes




This photo of the Sphinx Realty Company, located at 537 N. Fairfax Ave. across from where Fairfax High School now stands, supposedly dates to 1920, so it's too early for it to have been inspired by the Egyptology craze that swept the U.S. after Tutankhamun's tomb was discovered in 1922. Notice the signs listing nearby properties for sale. Back then you could buy a six-bedroom, corner stucco house for $7,200. (Photo via Los Angeles Public Library Collection)
This photo of the Sphinx Realty Company, located at 537 N. Fairfax Ave. across from where Fairfax High School now stands, supposedly dates to 1920, so it's too early for it to have been inspired by the Egyptology craze that swept the U.S. after Tutankhamun's tomb was discovered in 1922. Notice the signs listing nearby properties for sale. Back then you could buy a six-bedroom, corner stucco house for $7,200. (Photo via Los Angeles Public Library Collection)

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The Guadalupe Nipomo Dunes in Santa Barbara County have long been prized for their miles of pristine sand. And almost 100 years ago, those dunes were the setting for Cecil B. DeMille's 1923 film epic, 'The Ten Commandments."

Now archaeologists are digging up some of the remnants of that film set, including an intact plaster sphinx head that still has much of its original paint intact.

The 300-pound sphinx was one of 20 heads used during filming, and the second to be unearthed at the site. Colleen Hamilton is the lead archeologist for Lost City excavations at the Guadalupe Dunes site. She joined Take Two host A Martinez to talk about the dig.