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No Place Like LA: David and the weirdos of Long Beach




Downtown Long Beach at night
Downtown Long Beach at night
Flickr user Eyad Abutaha (Creative Commons)

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No Place Like L.A. is our new series that asks L.A. transplants and immigrants: "When was the moment you felt that Los Angeles was truly home?"

This is the story of David King from West Los Angeles.

I'm from Topeka, Kansas.

In a small place like Kansas, I didn't really fit in too well. I was always a little "artistic," I'd like to say. I think most folks would say I was a little headstrong.

I started playing music in bands and people would say, "Oh, he's a musician," and they'd all nod their heads like, "Yeah, that meant something different."

I was 28 when I got this little apartment down towards Long Beach, and the first morning I was living there, I wake up, make my coffee and look out the window.

My next door neighbor is in his slippers and his bathrobe walking down the street with a cigarette. And he goes down to the corner and buys his newspaper.

I thought, "Oh my god! If this was Kansas, there'd be a riot! People would be calling the police, like, 'There's this guy in his bathrobe on the street!'"

I just smiled! I thought, oh my god, I'm home. Nobody's going to bother me at all for being different.

TELL US YOUR OWN STORY, TOO. IF YOU'RE A TRANSPLANT OR IMMIGRANT, WHAT WAS THE MOMENT WHERE YOU THOUGHT TO YOURSELF, "L.A. FEELS LIKE HOME, NOW?"