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Backstage at the 90th Academy Awards




HOLLYWOOD, CA - MARCH 04:  In this handout provided by A.M.P.A.S.,  Warren Beatty  (L) and  Faye Dunaway attend the 90th Annual Academy Awards at the Dolby Theatre on March 4, 2018 in Hollywood, California.  (Photo by Matt Petit/A.M.P.A.S via Getty Images)
HOLLYWOOD, CA - MARCH 04: In this handout provided by A.M.P.A.S., Warren Beatty (L) and Faye Dunaway attend the 90th Annual Academy Awards at the Dolby Theatre on March 4, 2018 in Hollywood, California. (Photo by Matt Petit/A.M.P.A.S via Getty Images)
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Awards season came to a close Sunday night at Hollywood's Dolby Theater.  Many of the nominees made history.

Vanity Fair's Rebecca Keegan was perched backstage at the theater all week, from rehearsals to showtime. Keegan spoke to A Martinez about everything you didn't see on the telecast. The Frame's John Horn was also at the ceremony and joined in on the conversation.

Post-envelope gate worries

https://twitter.com/ThatRebecca/status/970512125398458369

Last year's Best Picture announcement was a bit of a disaster, and it was something the Academy and Price Waterhouse accountants did not want happening again. Keegan said she saw some new protocol implemented this time around.

One of the things I noticed was that the accountant in the stage right wings, which is where the error was made last year, it was a new accountant and she was using what looked to me to be a different procedure. 

When she would hand off the envelope she would say to the presenter, 'And this confirms that this is the envelope for the best actor category.' Also, if you looked at the envelopes, the font on them was enormous.

Me Too and Times Up movements make their mark

https://twitter.com/ThatRebecca/status/970502042220355584

The issue of inclusion was woven throughout the show from the very beginning of Jimmy Kimmel's monologue, all the way through to the end, with Guillermo Del Toro's speech acknowledging his status as an immigrant.

But it was the trio of Weinstein accusers consisting of Salma Hayak, Annabella Sciorra and Ashley Judd that Keegan recalled as the pivotal moment of the Times Up and Me Too moment.

I had watched them do this in rehearsal and it was very emotional, particularly for Annabella Sciorra. In rehearsals, she stepped to the microphone and began to read her script and just stepped back and said, 'Whoa.'

These are three women who have made allegations of sexual misconduct against Harvey Weinstein. In some cases, their careers have been really affected by that, and here they were on the film industry's biggest stage. 

Another woman responsible for perhaps the biggest moment of the night was Frances McDormand's Best Actress acceptance speech.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-86vgvZGMs4

McDormand introduced the world to a new word, "inclusion rider." It's a concept that was new to even her. Keegan spoke to one of the women behind the concept, which essentially means:

The idea is that if an actor has a rider where they can say, 'Hey I want my makeup artist with me on this movie...' they can have an inclusion rider and the suggestion that the folks at USC have made is that this inclusion rider mirror the general public.

In other words, your set — including the crew and background actors — will be 50/50 male/female, 40 percent people of color, 5 percent LGBT and 20 percent people with disabilities.

For more on the growing change in Hollywood, be sure to read The Frame's coverage of the 90th Academy Awards. You can find it here.