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Beyond road closures: The intense security behind Trump's California trip




US President Donald Trump waves before boarding the Air Force One at Zurich Airport in Zurich on January 26, 2018, after attending the World Economic Forum (WEF) annual meeting in Davos. / AFP PHOTO / Nicholas Kamm        (Photo credit should read NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)
US President Donald Trump waves before boarding the Air Force One at Zurich Airport in Zurich on January 26, 2018, after attending the World Economic Forum (WEF) annual meeting in Davos. / AFP PHOTO / Nicholas Kamm (Photo credit should read NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)
AFP Contributor/AFP/Getty Images

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If you liked Obama Jam '15, then you'll love Trump Jam '18. The commander-in-chief will touchdown in California Tuesday.

His first visit to the Golden State since the election, Trump is visiting as the long-fraught relationship between California and the administration begins a litigious new chapter. Just last week, the administration sued the state over its immigration policies. 

KQED's Scott Shafer says the visit could send a political ripple across California. 

"There's no question that just having the President go to the border and look at these prototypes for the wall that he wants to build is a reminder — as if anybody really needed one — but certainly in the immigrant community, Latinos, Asian Americans, and others, that this President is pretty hostile to immigration," Shafer says. 

But he adds that Democrats and Republicans could both look at the visit and claim victory.

"I think this is the kind of thing that will gin-up the base, but you know it works on both sides," he says.

While political watchers will be keeping a close eye on the Trump trip, others will be watching for something else Tuesday: Road closures. 

Visits from the presidential motorcade have been known to stop traffic and gum-up commutes. Inconvenient though it may be, it's all part of a coordinated effort to get the president safely from point A to point B, says former Secret Service agent Jonathan Wackrow.

"It's actually much more difficult than I think people realize," Wackrow explains. 

Typically, a security plan is built around a building or a set location. A motorcade route is very dynamic: it changes every foot. The Secret Service, through their advance process, has to identify vulnerabilities along the entire route, understanding where there are potential risks: Is it a threat of an organized attack? Is it a risk of just the driving environment: sharp curves, hills downgrades? Is it intersections, is it areas where groups of people can amass for different types of protest?

Wackrow adds that presidential popularity, as well as potential natural disasters, factor into the security decisions that the Secret Service will make. In California, he says, earthquakes and wildfires are a major concern.