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What do the SAG nominations mean for Oscars and the #MeToo movement?




WEST HOLLYWOOD, CA - DECEMBER 13:  Niecy Nash (L) and Olivia Munn speak onstage during the 24th Annual SAG Awards Nominations Announcement at SilverScreen Theater at the Pacific Design Center on December 13, 2017 in West Hollywood, California.  (Photo by Matt Winkelmeyer/Getty Images)
WEST HOLLYWOOD, CA - DECEMBER 13: Niecy Nash (L) and Olivia Munn speak onstage during the 24th Annual SAG Awards Nominations Announcement at SilverScreen Theater at the Pacific Design Center on December 13, 2017 in West Hollywood, California. (Photo by Matt Winkelmeyer/Getty Images)
Matt Winkelmeyer/Getty Images

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The Screen Actors Guild announced its nominations for the best work in TV and film today and it appears that women are going to have their voices amplified.

Olivia Munn and Niecy Nash, presented the nominations by video stream and at the SAG Awards ceremony on January 21, Kristen Bell will serve as the show's first ever host. Plus and all of the awards presenters will be women. This all adds up to what seems like a deliberate statement from the 84-year-old actors union. That is: women have a voice and they’re going to use it.

This year’s awards season is happening at a time when the #MeToo movement is unearthing near daily accounts of women being harassed or abused in all walks of life, including Hollywood. And the industry is being scrutinized for its overall treatment of women. Just today, writing in The New York Times, Salma Hayek revealed a harrowing account of working with producer Harvey Weinstein on her 2002 film “Frida.”

Kyle Buchanan, senior editor at New York Magazine's Vulture.com, joined The Frame host John Horn to talk about the SAG awards nominations and how the current conversation about sexual harassment and abuse in Hollywood is coloring this awards season so far.

Interview highlights:

On how the #MeToo movement is affecting who gets nominated this awards season, including for SAG awards:

Hollywood is looking for ways, with their votes this awards season, to say something about their current moment. If picking "Moonlight" for Best Picture this past Oscar year was saying something about the moment that we're living in, well that moment has only become more heightened and more fraught. It was interesting to look at what was nominated for SAG today, some of the frontrunners were "Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri," "Get Out," and "Lady Bird." And those are three movies that in some fashion– whether it's talking about gender, race or police brutality– have a lot to say about our current year. I think the reason why they are resonating, above and beyond the quality of the movies, is because they feel like movies of today. Because right now we want movies that tell us something about ourselves and our current moment.

On how the current conversation about sexual abuse and harassment is changing the tone of awards season, when Hollywood is usually celebrating itself:

Hollywood is remaking itself right now and accounting for appalling behavior that has been allowed to flourish for so long. So it'll be very interesting this awards season because that's the time usually where Hollywood can celebrate itself, can pat itself on the back, and I'm not sure it has the latitude to do that this year. But I do think that awards season is useful as a snapshot of where the industry is in that year, for good or for ill. And I really do think that this year, considering the movies that have come to the forefront of that conversation, is telling us a lot about where Hollywood is, where it lags and where it could go.



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