Weekend Edition Saturday for Saturday, February 8, 2014

January Job Growth Disappoints, But Unemployment Drops

The U.S. added just 113,000 jobs in January, instead of the 180,000 analysts had predicted. Despite the anemic gains, the unemployment rate inched down to 6.6 percent, the lowest level since October 2008.

Millenials Happy To Stay With Mom And Dad

More people in their late 20s are living at home with Mom and Dad than any previous generation. In a column for Bloomberg News, Zara Kessler argues that faced with a dismal economy, today's 20-somethings are redefining success in adulthood. NPR's Scott Simon speaks with Kessler about the cultural shift.
Will Sochi be a city of super-sized, expensive venues that sit mostly empty in the future? Maybe having different cities host the Olympics doesn't make much sense.

UN: Civilian Casualities Rise In Afghanistan

The United Nations has just released a grim report on civilian casualties in Afghanistan over the last year. Casualties rose 14 percent in 2013, with nearly 3,000 people killed and more than 5,500 injured.
A Spanish princess will appear in court Saturday to face charges of tax fraud and money laundering. It's the first time a Spanish royal has ever been tried in a criminal case. From Madrid, reporter Lauren Frayer talks to NPR's Scott Simon about the latest in a series of scandals that have sent the royal family's approval rating to an all-time low.

Montana Ranchers Learn Ways To Live With Wolves

Gray wolves are a controversial and polarizing animal in much of the American West. Wolves have slowly come back from extinction, forcing people to learn how to coexist with the cunning predator. One farmer is teaching his cattle to huddle together as bison do when threatened — there is safety in numbers.

Found: The First Porsche — And It Was Electric!

The very first car developed by Ferdinand Porsche was not a sleek speed machine. The wooden-framed, open-carriage P1 was recently unearthed in a garage in Austria where it sat for more than 100 years. NPR's Scott Simon speaks with Achim Stejskal, director of the Porsche Museum about the surprising find.

Secret Message In An Econ Textbook, Finally Decoded

A curious series of hieroglyphics appears in the first pages of the classic 1984 textbook, Lectures on Macroeconomics. Recently experts decoded the symbols and were surprised to find a poem. NPR's Scott Simon speaks with the book's co-author, Olivier Blanchard, and his daughter, Serena. Ms. Blanchard was just 8 years old when she wrote the verse that has puzzled economics students for generations.
In Marcel Theroux's Strange Bodies, dead people inhabit new bodies and immortality isn't all it's cracked up to be. Theroux tells NPR's Scott Simon, "I think that everyone who loves books has experienced the feeling of being taken over by another mind."

A Male Singer Shines In A Woman's World

António Zambujo sings fado, the style of music often called Portugal's blues — but his work owes more to João Gilberto and Chet Baker than to his contemporaries in the genre.
Secretary of State John Kerry has accused Bashar Assad's regime of using starvation as a weapon of war. Critics say the U.S. has not done enough to stop the violence, but Washington doesn't have many options.
Victoria Nuland, a top State Department official, thought she was having a private conversation. But someone else was listening, and her undiplomatic remarks were leaked online. This is how it may have happened.
Talks are underway between representatives of the Taliban and Pakistan's government. Meanwhile, the U.S. appears to have slowed the pace of drone attacks on Pakistan, which may be intended to allow Islamabad to pursue these peace talks. NPR's Scott Simon talks to Shuja Nawaz, the director of the South Asia Center at the Atlantic Council.
The Barack H. Obama Foundation launched this week, with the goal of raising millions of dollars to fund the 44th president's library and museum. The politics of picking a city for the venture, however, makes fundraising look easy.

Memento Of A Lost Childhood: Anne Frank's Marbles

Before her family went into hiding, Anne Frank gave away some of her toys to her neighbor, Toosje Kupers. The gift included a set of marbles, now on display at at an art gallery in Rotterdam. NPR's Scott Simon takes a moment to note the childhood gift.
Alex Rodriguez has accepted his season-long ban from baseball and dropped his lawsuits against the MLB and the Players Association. NPR's Scott Simon talks with Howard Bryant of ESPN.com and ESPN the Magazine about one of baseball's greatest and most infamous players.

Wacky Moments In Winter Olympic History

The problems with decrepit hotel rooms and stray dogs in Sochi, Russia, are stealing the headlines, but they are hardly the first Olympics to stumble. NPR's Scott Simon speaks with Esquire Magazine's AJ Jacobs about some of the more inglorious moments in Winter Olympics history.

A Furry Feline Welcome From A Cat Cafe

Plans are underway to open KitTea, a gourmet tea house in San Francisco, where patrons mingle with "resident" cats. The felines will come from rescue shelters and be up for adoption. NPR's Scott Simon talks to Courtney Hatt, the co-founder of KitTea, about starting a cat cafe.

Sochi An Olympic Spectacle Even Without The Games

What a week in Sochi, Russia! NPR's Scott Simon speaks with Olympics correspondent Tamara Keith about the ill-fated opening ceremony, stray dogs and bad hotel rooms, as well as who won the first gold medal.

Long Exposures Of A Creepy Garage (Also, The Beatles!)

Now a humble parking lot, the Washington Coliseum has seen a lot in its day — including a historic night in music.
In the animated world, just about anything goes: Toys talk, mice are chefs, and pandas do kung fu. In animation, the sky's the limit. In this encore broadcast, we learn about the hundreds of people working on big studio features who spend their days figuring out how to manufacture this silliness from the ground up. (This story originally aired on All Things Considered on Nov. 27, 2013.)
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