Weekend Edition Saturday for Saturday, April 5, 2014

Afghans Vote In Large Numbers Despite Risks

After a campaign marred by violence, Afghans voted Saturday in presidential elections for what's to be the first ever democratic transfer of power. Results are not expected for some time.

Argument May Have Led To Fort Hood Shooting

Officials at Fort Hood, Texas, are investigating an argument that may have led to a shooting spree there this week. They are moving away from a focus on the suspect's mental health issues.
Firefighters are often called upon to risk their lives. NPR's Scott Simon reflects on a week that demonstrated the extraordinary and surprising sacrifices they make.
The Justice Department wants the settlement with mining company Kerr-McGee to send a powerful message: corporations can't shirk their responsibility to clean up the toxic legacies of their operations.
The Affordable Care Act's poll numbers may rise now that seven million more Americans have a stake in its survival. Yet even a small number of people can still make trouble for the law.
The new play recounts two tense weeks at the mountain retreat as President Jimmy Carter helped broker a peace between Israeli prime minister Menachim Begin and Egyptian president Anwar Sadat.
Having money can make you callous and uncaring. For the TED Radio Hour, University of California Berkeley psychologist Paul Piff explains the research to back up this conclusion.
Ayya's Accounts: A Ledger of Hope in Modern India chronicles the life of an ordinary man in extraordinary times. NPR's Scott Simon talks to author Anand Pandian about his subject, his grandfather.
Portraits of world leaders painted by former President George W. Bush go on exhibit in Dallas on Saturday. He took up the hobby after he read Winston Churchill's essay, "Painting as Pastime."
Malls have long been the place to "shop till you drop." In Southern California, Forest Lawn, a funeral industry leader, has made them places to shop before you drop.

ABBA's Cheesy Start Was More Than Its 'Waterloo'

Forty years after ABBA strode into the world on platform boots, we consider why this Eurovision winner made it big across the pond.
Best-selling author Barbara Taylor Bradford's new novel follows two families living in a grand Edwardian manor. She tells NPR that Downton-style dramas are a way of encapsulating life in one house.
As a hotel manager in Rwanda, Paul Rusesabagina sheltered more than a thousand people, saving their lives during the 1994 genocide. Now, 20 years on, he says history is repeating itself.
Iran reportedly nominated a diplomat with ties to the 1979 takeover of the U.S Embassy in Tehran. It's the latest sign of how hard it will be for the U.S. and Iran to overcome decades of mistrust.
Afghans voted for a new president Saturday, with only scattered violence. NPR'S Renee Montagne tells NPR's Scott Simon that the vote reflects the country's tug between tradition and modernity.

For Syrian Refugees, 'Life Has Stopped'

Syrian refugees have flooded into Lebanon since the war began. The UN said this week that 1 million refugees are now in the country. NPR's Scott Simon and Alice Fordham discuss the impact.
The last time a professional woman golfer appeared on the cover of Golf Digest was 2008. This month's cover is a woman, but she's a model. NPR's Scott Simon gets details from ESPN's Howard Bryant.

Final Four Fans Bedeck Themselves In Team Colors

The men's Final Four in college basketball is Saturday in North Texas. With the teams come fans, some rabid in their love for for all things Huskies, Gators, Badgers and Wildcats.
The latest expression of over-the-top stadium food is a $25 bat-shaped corn dog packed with cheddar cheese, bacon and jalapeños. Its creator says he's game for some competition between teams.
At 86, Matthiessen has written what he says "may be his last word." In Paradise, a novel about a visit to a Nazi extermination camp, caps a career spanning six decades and 33 books.
Adam Begley says Updike created an everyman in his Rabbit book series, and inhabited him fully, "allowing that everyman's senses to be totally open to the American experience."
The Puerto Rican rap duo is one of the most controversial bands in Latin music today. Calle 13's new album Multi_Viral finds the band questioning the price of being outspoken in Latin America.
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