Weekend Edition Saturday for Saturday, May 3, 2014

International observers have been freed by pro-Russian forces in eastern Ukraine. Correspondent Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson speaks to NPR's Scott Simon about their release and new military action.
The U.S. wants Europe to enforce economic sanctions against Russia over its push into Ukraine, but the Pentagon itself is reluctant to stop trading with Moscow.
That catalog stuffed in the seat pocket during your flight is one of America's best-read publications. What does that say about us?
The U.S. was instrumental in South Sudan's independence. Now, as East Africa Correspondent Gregory Warner tells NPR's Scott Simon, it's leading the effort to restore peace.

Apple's Win Settles Samsung's Complaint, Too

In the latest round of litigation, Samsung has been ordered to pay $119.6 million to Apple. It was a mixed verdict. The jury found that both sides violated each other's patents.
Can political opposites attract? Ralph Nader's new book makes a case for the far left and right to come together. He tells NPR's Scott Simon there's common ground in opposing corporate America.
A federal court has ruled that being "at work" no longer has to mean physically in the office. Employment lawyers are expecting a flood of requests to telecommute, and say they'll be harder to deny.

A Black Sheep Crashes The Kentucky Derby

California Chrome is a flashy red horse with a big white blaze down his face. Unlike his competition, he's from humble origins, but more important than his breeding is his speed.
Novelist Colson Whitehead is also a devoted poker player. And in 2011 Grantland gave him the assignment to write about the World Series of Poker — by playing in it.
Pinball was once banned in New York City, lumped in with gambling and other social evils. It's crime? Stealing lunch money of innocent children.
Ida is the story of a young woman on the verge of taking her vows to be a nun when she learns her parents were murdered Jews. Pawel Pawlikowski's new film is unlike the director's other movies.
The April jobs report came in much better than expected, though the shrinking labor force leaves some unanswered questions.
Concerned about digital advertising revenue, Slate Magazine has started raising money through a paid-membership program. Media correspondent David Folkenflik explains the move to NPR's Scott Simon.
Harry McAlpin became the first black White House reporter in 1944, though he was excluded from joining the Correspondents' Association. Decades later, he'll be be honored at the group's centennial.
The Sinn Fein Leader was arrested this week for a 1972 murder based on evidence collected by a Boston College project. NPR's Scott Simon talks with Beth McMurtrie of The Chronicle of Higher Education.
The Hall of Famer calls the punishment for Donald Sterling's racist remarks wise and just, but wonders why the NBA tolerated the Clippers owner's "shameful record" for so many years.
The NBA's ban on Clippers owner Donald Sterling has drawn approval all around. ESPN's Howard Bryant tells NPR's Scott Simon that with such heinous remarks, the league may not have had much choice.
The Final Four tournament was a real nail-biter, coming amid controversy over huge salaries and reports of top recruits stolen. Professor Richard Vedder discusses college chess with NPR's Scott Simon.
A Sri Lankan soprano is shattering stereotypes. Tharanga Goonetilleke tells NPR's Scott Simon about being an opera singer and the first Sri Lankan woman accepted to The Juilliard School.
As bookstores both large and small close across the country, Posman Books, a niche-focused, nimble bookseller, is about to open its fourth store in Manhattan.

'24' Returns To Live Another Action-Packed Day

Jack Bauer is back and fighting terrorism in Europe. Can he save the day again? NPR's Scott Simon speaks with Kiefer Sutherland about bringing Bauer back for a new season of "24."
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