Weekend Edition Sunday for Sunday, January 12, 2014

The Struggle Against A Newly Resurgent Al-Qaida

Sunni leaders in Iraq are trying to retake control of two important cities in Anbar province. That's raising fears in Afghanistan, where al-Qaida operatives still reside near the border with Pakistan. The Washington Post's David Ignatius talks to NPR's Rachel Martin about the rise of al-Qaida-affiliated groups and America's relations with Afghanistan.
Former Navy SEAL Marcus Luttrell was the only survivor of a mission in Afghanistan in 2005, where along with three other SEALS he was tasked with killing a top Taliban commander. His story became the basis of his book, Lone Survivor, which has now been turned into a movie. Luttrell talks with NPR's Rachel Martin about his story.
Upscale department store Neiman Marcus is the latest retailer to disclose data security breaches. The disclosure comes just a day after Target issued another apology for a data breach that occurred during the holiday season. NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with Brian Krebs, who broke both stories on his blog, KrebsOnSecurity.
The crumbling Centennial Baptist Church in Helena, Ark., has deep roots in the African-American community. But poverty and other concerns in this Delta town have made raising restoration funds difficult — and the effort to keep the church in black hands has sparked tensions with local preservationists.

New Tax Can't Keep Greeks From Smoking

More than 40 percent of Greeks over 15 smoke, among the highest percentages in the world. Three years ago, the government banned smoking indoors in bars, restaurants and cafes — but the ban has never been enforced.
Ever have an imaginary friend? Chris Zdarsky started corresponding with an Applebee's in Canada as a joke. But that doesn't mean it wasn't real. NPR's Rachel Martin talks with the comic book artist to about his virtual friendship.

A's On Either End

Every answer is a word that begins and ends with the letter A. You'll be given an anagram of the letters between the A's. For example, given "ern," the answer would be, "arena."
Artis Henderson was just 26 when her husband, Miles, died in Iraq. Marrying him meant leaving behind the life she had planned for herself — and his death redefined her life all over again. Henderson's debut memoir is called Unremarried Widow.
The film The Act of Killing visits former Indonesian death squad killers who wrought havoc from 1965, slaughtering between half- and 2 million people in a genocide often forgotten. NPR's Rachel Martin talks to filmmaker Joshua Oppenheimer about his new documentary, which is shortlisted for an Oscar nomination.
Four years ago, an earthquake heavily damaged Port-au-Prince and killed more than 200,000 people. Many areas of the Haitian capital now look much like they did before the 7.0-magnitude quake. But nearly 150,000 are still living in temporary structures.
Rachel Garlinghouse and her husband, both white, have adopted three African-American children. She tells NPR's Rachel Martin that her trans-racial family makes her look at discrimination "in a whole new way." Garlinghouse says she must be humble and realistic about the challenges.

Ariel Sharon Was Part Of Israel's Tragedy And Solution

Former Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon died on Saturday. He was a soldier-turned-politician who believed in hardline military solutions but also looked beyond force to try to bring peace in Israel. NPR's Rachel Martin talks to Ari Shavit of The Haaretz newspaper about what Sharon meant for the Israeli-Palestinian peace process.

New Constitution Is A Sign Of Tunisia's Optimism

Tunisian lawmakers are poised to give final approval to a new constitution later this week. Political wrangling over the document has long delayed the ratification process, but if the constitution gains final approval on Tuesday, as planned, it will set the stage for a new round of parliamentary elections.

From Asghar Farhadi, More Questions Than Answers

The Iranian director who made the Oscar-winning A Separation has scored more awards-season attention; his new film The Past, another wonderfully layered study of domestic dynamics, is up for a Golden Globe.

Insane Clown Posse Sues FBI For Targeting Fans

Fans of the band Insane Clown Posse, known as Juggalos, were classified as a gang by the FBI in 2011. Now the band and four fans have filed a lawsuit against the Department of Justice and the FBI. NPR's Rachel Martin talks about the suit with journalist Patrick Flanary, who covered the suit for Rolling Stone magazine.

The Brawl Over Baseball Hall Of Fame Voting

The new Baseball Hall of Fame inductees were announced this week — and it's not just who got in and who didn't that's causing a stir; the voting itself has people talking. Sports correspondent Mike Pesca speaks with NPR's Rachel Martin about that and the reduction of New York Yankee Alex Rodriguez's suspension.
Sunday's Golden Globes celebratie a diverse group of actors, but beyond those standouts, Hollywood is still a tough town for minorities. In a "who-you-know" business, professionals say, the only color that really matters is green.
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