Weekend Edition Sunday for Sunday, February 2, 2014

The conservative magazine The National Review is offering House Republicans a strategy on immigration reform: Do nothing. National Review editor Rich Lowry tells NPR's Rachel Martin why he thinks the best political move for Republican lawmakers is to hold off on passing an immigration bill.

Oil Train Derailments Spur Calls For Safety Measures

Roughly a million barrels of oil are being drilled from the North Dakota plains every day. Tens of millions of dollars have been put toward infrastructure for transporting that oil out of state, but recent derailments and explosions involving oil tanker trains are prompting calls for a slow-down.

Sap Discovery Could Turn Syrup-Making Upside Down

For centuries, people thought sap had to flow down a tree's body through a spigot at the bottom. But researchers have discovered that sap can flow upwards, too, which allows syrup production from much younger trees, and could even turn maple syrup into a row crop.

Violence Gives Way To Calmer Thai Elections

Tensions are high in Thailand, after several were injured in protests in the capital, Bangkok, ahead of elections Sunday. NPR's Rachel Martin talks with reporter Michael Sullivan about the significance of the elections.

American Muslim Men Balance Faith And Love In 'Salaam'

American Muslim author Haroon Moghul was bound and determined to go to his high school prom — and he wrote about it for the new essay collection, Salaam, Love: American Muslim Men on Love, Sex and Intimacy. Moghul tells NPR's Rachel Martin that he thought the experience might help him understand himself better.

After Crushing Bad Luck, A Free Bungee Jump

German tourists Paul Zeller and Nico Reiner were enjoying a vacation on New Zealand's South Island when a tree fell and crushed their car. NPR's Rachel Martin takes a moment to note that the tourists were offered free bungee jumps as compensation.

Super Bowl Sunday Pits Broncos Against Seahawks

The Broncos and the Seahawks take the field Sunday to play for the Vince Lombardi Trophy in New York. Sports correspondent Mike Pesca speaks with NPR's Rachel Martin about the Super Bowl.
Why not fold your slice outward so the cheese and tomato sauce are directly on your tongue? One foodie proposes this and other mind-bending ways to consume pies on Super Bowl Sunday.

Drop The Zero And Get With The Hero

For each single letter given, recombine it with the letters in the word "ZERO" to spell a new word. For example, ZERO plus F would be "FROZE."
Amazon has joined the legions of mainstream publishing houses with a religious imprint, Waterfall Press. But Waterfall isn't just religious — it's specifically Christian. Yale seminarian Win Bassett tells NPR that Christian publishing is a billion-dollar business that includes some surprising authors.
Wiley Cash's new novel follows two sisters whose errant father kidnaps them out of foster care after their mother dies. Cash tells NPR's Rachel Martin about his decision to set the story during Mark McGwire and Sammy Sosa's 1998 home run battle.

Ancient Syrian City A Wasteland Of Modern Violence

The ancient Syrian city of Homs was one of the first parts of the country to rise up against the Assad regime. Now, it's very difficult for western reporters to visit the city. We take a rare glimpse inside the city, from spring 2013, when the fighting was already fierce. (This story originally aired on Morning Edition on June 3, 2013.)

Homs Is Birthplace Of Syrian Protest

The city of Homs has been under siege since the Syrian civil war began. Dr. Zaher Sahloul, president of the Syrian American Medical Society, tells NPR's Rachel Martin that Homs is the historical center of anti-government protests.

Should Uber Be Responsible For Driver Recklessness?

The family of a 6-year-old girl who was hit and killed by an Uber driver is suing the ride-sharing company. They say the driver was distracted by the mobile app he used to find his next fare.

Seahawks, Broncos Fans Mingle In D.C. Watering Hole

All season long, it's been a convivial scene at Washington's Penn Quarter sports bar, where fans of the Denver Broncos cheered their team alongside fans of the Seattle Seahawks. The question is, what will happen there on Super Bowl Sunday, when the two teams face off?
John Moffitt was an offensive lineman for the Seattle Seahawks for two seasons, and then got traded to another powerhouse team, the Denver Broncos. Those two teams are playing in Super Bowl XLVIII, but Moffitt won't be on the field; he quit midway through this season. Moffitt joins NPR's Rachel Martin to talk about his decision to walk away from football.
Bombings are a frequent reality of living in Lebanon, so Lebanese student Sandra Hassan made an app to alert let friends and family know you're okay after violence strikes. It's getting a lot more attention that she had originally imagined.

Despite Scars Of War, Karachi Holds Onto Its Chutzpah

Karachi is Pakistan's economic hub, its major port and its largest city. It's also the country's most violent and crime-ridden city. But it's not all blood and thunder. Witness the musical Grease, now playing to packed houses in Karachi.

Anna Quindlen Spins A Tale Of Middle-Aged Reinvention

Still Life With Bread Crumbs follows a photographer who is no longer married, no longer needed as much by her grown son and no longer as successful as she used to be. When her funds start to dry up, she heads to a small, rural town for a fresh start.

Music For Folks Who've Been Through A Few Things

Shelby Earl worked behind the scenes in the music industry for years — until the late 2000s, when she decided to take the plunge and become a full-time singer/songwriter. NPR's Rachel Martin talks with Earl about her second album, Swift Arrows.
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