Weekend Edition Sunday for Sunday, May 18, 2014

Voters Hope Modi Can Revive India's Economy

NPR's Lynn Neary talks to Sadanand Dhume of the American Enterprise Institute about the results of the Indian election.
In 1966, Hortense McClinton became the first black professor hired by the University of North Carolina. She says in some ways, things are better since Brown v. Board — but in some ways, they aren't.
Courts have found a new source of funding by charging fees to defendants who go through the criminal justice system. NPR's Joe Shapiro tells NPR's Lynn Neary about his year-long investigation into the fees.
Economists say too much income inequality is a bad thing. But they also say some inequality is necessary, and even good for society. Here are suggestions for finding that balance.
Stories about poverty can evoke strong reactions, in part because Americans are conflicted about the topic. Both bad circumstances and bad choices can be the cause.
NPR's Lynn Neary talks to science correspondent Rob Stein about the first human-to-human infection of MERS in the U.S.

Finding The Answers Within

This week's on-air challenge clues are the winners and runners up from the two-week creative challenge. Spoiler alert: The answers for the on-air challenge are given away on this week's puzzle page.
A nonprofit organization called First Book is planning to buy up and distribute thousands of childrens' books in order to convince publishers that a market exists for diverse characters and cultures.
Jazz bassist Rufus Reid has played with just about everybody in the mainstream jazz world, but his latest project is a work exploring the intersection of music and the visual arts.
Ukraine votes next week in a presidential election, but there's still separatist unrest in the east. NPR's Corey Flintoff tells NPR's Lynn Neary how a local oligarch restored peace in one city.
The U.N. has negotiated the release of more than 1,000 child soldiers in CAR. NPR's Lynn Neary talks to Alexandra Zavis, a reporter who met with some of the former child fighters.
Why would anyone pay for something when the exact same thing is available for free? That's the question asked of an obscure federal agency pursuing a Cold War mission in the age of the search engine.
On Tuesday, voters in six states head to the polls for primary elections. NPR's Charles Mahtesian gives NPR's Lynn Neary a preview of what to expect.

Putting A Face Behind The 'Sting Of The Drone'

NPR's Lynn Neary talks to former national coordinator for Security and Counter-Terrorism Richard A. Clarke. He's written a new thriller, Sting of the Drone, a fictional look at the U.S. drone program.
Instant replay allows referees to look back at what happened, but not to call fouls retroactively. NPR's Lynn Neary talks to Slate.com's Mike Pesca about how the replay has affected the NBA playoffs.
A new exhibit about ethnic newspapers, radio and TV stations and other media outlets has opened at the Newseum in Washington, D.C.
In Israel, Christians make up just 2 percent of the population. Their numbers are rising and the population diversifying.
White missionaries used to travel to Africa to save souls. Today, the trend is reversed, as evangelists from the global south target Americans and Europeans they say are ripe for Christian renewal.

Novel Humanizes The 'Hyena Of The Gestapo'

Lovers at the Chameleon Club, Paris 1932 is the latest novel by author Francine Prose. NPR's Lynn Neary speaks with Prose about her novel, set in Paris from the 1920s to the end of World War II.
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