Weekend Edition Sunday for Sunday, June 1, 2014

POW Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl was freed Saturday after five years in captivity. NPR's Rachel Martin talks to correspondent Sean Carberry in Kabul, Afghanistan, for the latest information.

POW's Hometown Worked For Years To Bring Him Home

Stefanie O'Neill has been leading the "Bring Bowe Back" campaign in Hailey, Idaho. NPR's Rachel Martin talks to O'Neill about the hometown reaction to POW Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl's release.
In France, the far right's victory in last week's election was one more crisis for President Francois Hollande. Even before the vote, he was rated the most unpopular French president in 50 years.
President Obama observes two big anniversaries in Europe this week. But White House reporter Scott Horsley tells NPR's Rachel Martin that this trip is more about the future than the past.
President Obama plans to announce Monday his most ambitious plan yet to combat climate change. NPR's Rachel Martin talks to Princeton professor Michael Oppenheimer about the significance of the plan.

New Orleans Closes Its Last Traditional Schools

Last week, the New Orleans school district became the first all-charter district in the country. NPR's Rachel Martin talks to Sarah Carr, a reporter who's been following the city's changing schools.

Maya Angelou, Foodie

When NPR's Rachel Martin spoke with Maya Angelou last year, the activist, teacher and poet revealed another side of herself. Angelou said she was also a lover and maker of good food.
Donald Levine, an executive at Hasbro, served in the Army in Korea and thought G.I. Joe would be a way to honor veterans. (This story originally aired on All Things Considered on May 26.)

Getting To Know The IN Crowd

Every answer to the given clue is a made-up, two-word phrase in which you add IN to the front of the first word to get the second word.
The knish is a classic Jewish comfort food — a pillow of dough filled with savory fillings like mashed potatoes. Author Laura Silver says that the New York knish is also filled with stories.
NPR's Rachel Martin talks to singer and actor Rick Springfield about his debut novel, Magnificent Vibration, a fantastical story about a man with a 1-800 number to God.
Shen Tong was a 20-year-old biology student and an activist in Tiananmen Square 25 years ago when the government used deadly force to crush the massive protests.
Students were the driving force behind the 1989 pro-democracy protests in Beijing. China's youth now have other worries, the events of 25 years ago forgotten and buried by time and the government.
A U.S. citizen who blew himself up in a suicide attack in Syria last week grew up in Florida, according to U.S. officials. NPR's Rachel Martin talks to former FBI Intelligence adviser Philip Mudd.
President Bashar Assad is sure to win in Tuesday's election. Some opponents are boycotting the vote, airing frustrations through bleak satire. There are signs that others will use violence in protest.
Panama City's skyline is full of gleaming office towers and the economy is the fastest growing in Latin America thanks to the canal. But the country still suffers from glaring social inequalities.
Need a place to stay for the World Cup? NPR's Rachel Martin talks with Elliot Rosenberg of Favela Experience, a company that offers inexpensive home-stays in one of Brazil's slums.
NPR's Rachel Martin talks to Slate.com's Mike Pesca about the record $2 billion purchase of the LA Clippers, and about why no one wants to host the 2022 Winter Olympics.
Science is always churning out weird, funny and fascinating findings. What did we miss this week? NPR's Rachel Martin checks in with science writer Rose Eveleth.
NPR's Rachel Martin talks to Martin Dugard about his new book, The Explorers, which tells the harrowing story of two adventurers and their search for the source of the Nile.

In Perfect Movie Music, Filling Space Is An Art

If Brian Reitzell does his job right, you'll enjoy the movie you're watching a lot more — without knowing why. He speaks with NPR's Rachel Martin about being a music supervisor for Hollywood films.
Rep. Mike Rogers is critical of negotiating with the Taliban, but an exchange took place to free Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl. NPR's Rachel Martin talks to Rogers, chairman of the House Intelligence Committee.
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