Weekend Edition Sunday for Sunday, June 8, 2014

Bowe Bergdahl's release from Taliban custody has raised fresh questions about Guantanamo prisoners. Correspondent Dina Temple-Raston tells NPR's Rachel Martin what happens after their release.
The House bill to halt the NSA's collection of call data would force the agency to request records from phone companies. But if companies don't keep those records, the NSA's efforts could be crippled.

On D-Day, The French Remember U.S. Sacrifices

World leaders gathered in Normandy this week to mark the 70th anniversary of D-Day. On Friday, President Obama paid tribute to U.S. servicemen at the American Cemetery in Colleville-sur-Mer.
The Syrian civil war is now in its fourth year. Many are calling it the worst humanitarian situation in a generation. Faith groups and human rights activists are divided over what to do.
Planning a vacation can be daunting, especially for people with disabilities. NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with Carole Zoom, a disability activist who's traveled the world.
Soccer kicks off this week with a match between Brazil and Croatia. Authors of The Glorious World Cup, Alan Black and David Henry Sterry, speak to NPR's Rachel Martin about the most-watched sport in the world.
It doesn't matter if it's Asia or Africa or Central America, kids make a goal out of something, throw out a ball and the game is on.

A Puzzle In E-Z Mode

Every answer is a familiar two-word phrase or name in which the first word ends in E and the second word starts with Z.

Capturing A Dreamlike Moment In 'Time Present'

Weekend Edition is asking authors to recommend some great reads; the conversations kick off with Clever Girl author Tessa Hadley, who touts Irish novelist Dierdre Madden's Time Present and Time Past.
The film follows a comic as she gets dumped, fired and pregnant from a one-night stand. Director Gillian Robespierre says despite the film's dark opening, she always knew it'd have a happy ending.

Pope To Host Peres And Abbas For Peace Meeting

Israeli and Palestinian presidents will meet at the Vatican on Sunday for an "intense prayer session" with Pope Francis. European correspondent Sylvia Poggioli sets the scene with NPR's Rachel Martin.
Katharine Hayhoe is an atmospheric scientist and a devout Christian working to convince her fellow Christians that climate change is real. "God gave us the brains to make good choices," she says.
A health reporter traveled across the country and asked people how they feel about health care and health insurance. At almost every stop people complained about the expense.
For decades, inpatient rehab has been one of the go-to treatments for addiction. Instead, a new movement promotes treating addiction as a chronic illness that requires lifelong care.
Disney movies are typically dubbed into Egyptian Arabic, but the movie Frozen has been dubbed into Modern Standard Arabic. NPR's Rachel Martin talks to Elias Muhanna of Brown University about why.
Journalist Ruth Graham thinks adults shouldn't be reading young adult books. She speaks with NPR's Rachel Martin about the criticism she's received for writing that for Slate.

Words Unlocked Free Voices Of Young Offenders

Aaron Martin's poem, "Meth," won this year's poetry contest for youths serving time in correctional facilities. NPR's Rachel Martin speaks to Martin and his teacher, Kim DeForest.

Filing For Divorce From The World In 'Eyrie'

Tim Winton is one of Australia's most decorated literary novelists. Rachel Martin speaks to Winton about his new novel, Eyrie, where good struggles with evil.
Sunday night's Tony Awards will honor actors and actresses, but not those who create their elaborate coiffures. That's because the best in the business know how to stay out of the spotlight.
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