Weekend Edition Sunday for Sunday, July 6, 2014

Tensions are high following the murder of three young Israelis and a Palestinian teen. Relatives of the murdered Palestinian say his American cousin was beaten by Israeli police during a protest.
As Iraq continues to fracture along along ethnosectarian lines, its newly elected parliament doesn't appear to be rushing to form a government to address the dire situation.
As Iran helps Iraqi government forces fight rebels pushing through Iraq, the use of unarmed Iranian drones has U.S. officials on edge, as analyst Anthony Cordesman explains to NPR's Linda Wertheimer.
The pontiff will meet with six survivors Monday. Correspondent Sylvia Poggioli tells NPR's Linda Wertheimer the pope has been criticized for being slow to address the issue of sex abuse by priests.
East German communism collapsed 25 years ago. But the city of Schwerin still has a Lenin statue, believed to be the last one in Germany. The mayor says it should stay because you can't erase history.

Argentina Squabbles Over Juan Peron Statue

NPR's Linda Wertheimer takes a moment to note that 40 years after his death, former Argentine President Juan Peron still can't manage to get a statue erected in his honor.
Though not yet 30, The Kentucky Sisters sing songs that date back to the 1920s. Along the way, they've found that a little emotional involvement can make learning history a lot more fun.

It's A Nice Day For A Flash Wedding

In these pop-up weddings, locations are never booked, planning is minimal and fingers are crossed that you don't get asked to leave before you finish the ceremony.
Two clues will be given for two five-letter answers. Move the middle letter of the first answer to the end of the word to get the second answer.
"Sinning with the choir" is one of many errors featured in a new book called Just My Typo. NPR's Linda Wertheimer speaks with author Drummond Moir, who compiled the collection of funny misspellings.
Sheldon Harnick, the lyricist of Fiddler on the Roof and Fiorello!, wrote dozens of songs for those shows and others that never saw the stage.
The election impasse continues in Afghanistan. Preliminary results are due on Monday, following an audit of ballots, but Abdullah Abdullah, who is trailing his rival, says he won't accept the results.
Thousands of locals gathered early Sunday morning in Lac-Megantic to mark one year since a deadly train explosion in the small Eastern Canadian city killed 47 people.
One year after an oil train derailed and exploded in Lac-Megantic, Quebec, some firemen and first responders say they still don't have the training or manpower to handle a similar disaster.

New IRS Chief John Koskien: 'I Enjoy A Crisis'

Koskien is a professional fixer. He has helmed a mortgage lending giant, a city and now the IRS through scandals and disasters — to varying degrees of success, as he tells NPR's Linda Wertheimer.
Documentarian Adam Wishart has spent the last year trying to find Samantha Lewthwaite, who is believed to be involved in terrorist activities. He talks to NPR's Linda Wertheimer about his search.
One of the few piano teachers in Pakistan's capital is determined to keep his art alive. To avoid being victimized by hard-line Islamists, he teaches on digital keyboards with the volume dialed down.
A new study argues emperor penguins should be classified as an endangered species because of shrinking ice. NPR's Linda Wertheimer speaks with scientist Hal Caswell, who co-authored the study.
Land a deal with a label or put out records on your own: Both options carry big risks. For musicians today there's a middle ground, but getting your songs in front of people will still cost you.
Did you know you can't kill a gopher with chewing gum and hummingbirds are not attracted to red flowers? C.L. Fornari's book Coffee For Roses busts common gardening myths.
You know when you dial a number, and a man reads you the exact time at the tone? That precise timekeeping starts at the Naval Observatory in Washington, D.C. NPR's Linda Wertheimer takes a tour.
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