Weekend Edition Sunday for Sunday, July 20, 2014

NPR's Arun Rath gets the latest from correspondent Corey Flintoff at the site of last week's downing of a Malaysian jetliner in Eastern Ukraine.
Dutch editor Willem Schouten tells NPR's Arun Rath that people in the Netherlands are saddened and outraged over the downing of the Malaysia Airlines flight. Nearly 200 of victims were Dutch.
The Justice Department has indicted FedEx for shipping prescription drugs from illegal online pharmacies. FedEx had been warned, and now faces up to $1.6 billion in fines if found guilty.
Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti says he is working with the White House to house unaccompanied minors who entered the U.S. illegally. He talks with NPR's Arun Rath about the controversial decision.
Congress can't come up with an agreement to pay for road repairs and construction over the long haul, but like a road crew filling a pothole, they do seem to have a patch at hand.
Author Douglas Coupland tells NPR's Arun Rath that he's not exactly sure how the lead character of his new novel entered his mind. (This story originally aired on Morning Edition on April 19, 2014.)
The British comedy troupe has reunited for what they say is the final time in Monty Python Live (Mostly). Fans around the world will watch the last show Sunday, either in London or via live stream.

Take A Ride On The Plural Side

Two clues will be given. The first answer will be a brand name that sounds like it's plural; change the first letter to spell a new word that answers the second clue.
Its name is esoteric, but the diatonic phrygian tetrachord is perhaps the most common sequence in music. WNYC's David Garland tells NPR's Arun Rath how those four notes crop up from baroque to rock.
Felix Contreras and Jasmine Garsd of NPR Music's Alt.Latino bring NPR's Arun Rath a stack of the best new music in the Latin music scene.
NPR's Arun Rath talks to Wall Street Journal reporter James Marson about Vladimir Putin's response to mounting international anger at Russia following the downing of a civilian plane over Ukraine.
Former Navy Adm. James Stavridis tells NPR's Arun Rath what steps the alliance might take in response to the downing of the Malaysian airliner over Ukraine.
While Israelis seek refuge from Hamas rockets in ubiquitous shelters, Palestinians crowd into schools to escape Israeli airstrikes. Conditions there grow dire as the conflict drags on.
Ebola virus in Sierra Leone is killing dozens by the week. Medical workers have responded by expanding a field hospital, taking extraordinary measures to contain infection.
Science writer Chris Solomon tells NPR's Arun Rath that global warming has caused an influx of new diseases in animals that could eventually spread to humans.
Forty-five years after man first walked on the moon, Alan Bean, who was part of the second lunar landing, talks to NPR's Arun Rath about his stormy launch and how he translates space travel into art.
Archaeologists have found that for a period of about 7,000 years, people were eating a weed that may have helped them avoid cavities. (This story originally aired on All Things Considered on July 16.)
"There's nothing scarier than the neighbors," says Night of the Living Dead director George A. Romero. His latest zombie tale is a comic book set in New York City called The Empire of the Dead.

'Transformers' Inspires Chinese Farmer-Artists

Some Chinese farmers have left their plows and taken to welding giant robot replicas in public spaces. The craze follows release of the new Transformers movie, China's biggest-ever box office hit.

A Guitar Hero Draws His Own Sketches Of Spain

Milos, the one-named superstar of classical guitar, says the story of the instrument's 20th-century journey is told in the work of two Spanish composers.
Garner was known for wise-cracking, tough-guy characters who were not afraid to bend the rules. NPR's Arun Rath talks with biographer Jon Winokur about the actor's prolific career.
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