The World

An award-winning daily show, “PRI's The World” brings one-of-a-kind international stories home to America. "The World's" coverage is provided by a global network of international journalists, including access to 250 BBC correspondents.

Recent Episodes

PRI's The World: 11/25/2013

Iranians greet a nuclear deal with celebrations, but skepticism abounds in Washington and elsewhere. Also, could a warming climate have more to do with Typhoon Haiyan's intensity than originally thought? Plus, regulating the 'overuse' of cinnamon.

PRI's The World: 11/22/2013

Memories from around the world of President John F. Kennedy, and of the day he was assassinated 50 years ago. Plus, an American veteran of the Korean War is detained in North Korea. And, the hit song by a Belgian nun that topped the charts in the weeks after the death of JFK.

PRI's The World: 11/21/2013

Activists walk out of a major international climate conference, protesting that not enough progress is being made to curb climate change. Also, how President John F. Kennedy's assassination ended hopes for a reconciliation with Fidel Castro. Plus, why samba defines Brazil.

PRI's The World: 11/20/2013

Afghanistan reaches an agreement in principle with the US to allow troops to stay beyond 2014. A Google ad raises emotions for people on both sides of the India/Pakistan divide. And people in Minsk remember Lee Harvey Oswald — with fondness.

PRI's The World: 11/19/2013

More revelations emerge about the National Security Agency spying on foreign citizens — this time, it's Norway. Australia is also in hot water after revelations that it spied on Indonesian officials. And, Japan's Bunny Island, a place with a dark past, has become an unlikely tourist destination.

PRI's The World: 11/18/2013

Aid continues to pour into devastated areas of the Philippines. But Filipinos at home and abroad are criticizing their government. Plus, how the general who led the coup in Egypt has become a revered hero for many Egyptians. And, decoding a Dutch holiday tradition known as "Black Pete."