Adolfo Guzman-Lopez

Education Correspondent

Contact Adolfo Guzman-Lopez

I focus stories on college students who are at a crossroads, particularly those on the first rung into higher education. Many of those students are trying to overcome academic and other challenges because they believe college will be the path to a better life. How do the people around them -- in their personal lives and at the institutions they attend -- help or hinder their success?

Stories by Adolfo Guzman-Lopez

Visual Art Strikes a Chord with L.A. Punk Rocker

Punk rock singer Exene Cervenka of the band X is showing off a new exhibit of collages in Culver City. It traces her punk rock travels and her emotional trips. KPCC's Adolfo Guzman-Lopez reports.

Turning a Passion for Cars into an Associate's Degree

Governor Schwarzenegger and other lawmakers want public school students to get more vocational education and one program that could stand to benefit is automotive education. KPCC's Adolfo Guzman-Lopez profiles a recent community college graduate who enrolled in an auto program because his high school didn't offer one.

LAUSD Renames Magnet in Honor of Journalist Daniel Pearl

26 years ago, slain Wall Street Journal reporter Daniel Pearl graduated from Birmingham High School in Van Nuys. Now, the school's magnet journalism program carries his name. KPCC's Adolfo Guzman-Lopez reports.

Artist Probes Socialization Role of High School ROTC

For more than a decade, Santa Monica photographer and filmmaker Jona Frank has peered into the eyes of high school teens. In a new exhibit, Frank explores teens' often painful yearning to belong.

Big Donations Boost LA Charter Schools

Impoverished Los Angeles neighborhoods can expect to see more new charter schools in coming years. A Los Angeles charter company announced Thursday it has raised $10 million to open 13 new campuses.

Demonstrators Return to MacArthur Park

Immigration reform demonstrators held another rally at MacArthur Park on Thursday, two weeks after violence marred a May 1 rally. The May Day demonstration ended when police used batons and rubber bullets to clear people from the park after some demonstrators lobbed bottles and rocks at them.

Villaraigosa-Backed Candidates Win L.A. School Board Seats

Los Angeles Deputy City Attorney Tamar Galatzan and former West Covina Unified Superintendent Richard Vladovic were both elected Tuesday to the L.A. Unified Board of Education. Both candidates were endorsed by Mayor Villaraigosa.

Candidates Spend Millions in Race for School Board Seat

Two seats on the L.A. Unified Board of Education are open in this week's runoff elections. In one of those races, candidates are likely to spend more than $3 million to win a part-time position that pays $24,000 a year. KPCC's Adolfo Guzman-Lopez reports.

Muckraking Web Master Digs Dirt on Long Beach

Publishers of a new weekly Long Beach newspaper claim that L.A. County's second largest city is media-starved. Some residents and civic leaders say the city's only daily newspaper can't do it all. They point to a Long Beach Web site they say is providing original reporting missed by many media outlets. KPCC's Adolfo Guzman-Lopez reports.

South L.A. Residents Sound Off on Rally Violence

The FBI has agreed to a request by Los Angeles police chief Bill Bratton to investigate the violence that followed Tuesday's immigration rally at MacArthur Park. The violence has been the talk of many Angelenos.

LA Mayor: MacArthur Park Scuffle "Wrong"

LA Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa spoke in LA for the first time about Tuesday's violent protest in MacArthur Park. The mayor cut short a trade mission to answer the growing outcry about LAPD use of force at the march.

L.A. Immigrant Rights Rally Turns Violent

One of two large pro-immigrant protests in Los Angeles yesterday ended in violence. Los Angeles police officers in riot gear fired rubber bullets and used batons to disperse thousands of people. Several, including journalists, were injured.

Hate Watchdog Group Issues Warning About Southland Professor

The Southern Poverty Law Center is out with a warning that a Southland professor's academic research fuels the agenda of white supremacist groups. The professor insists he doesn't support the views of those groups.

Japanese-Born Architect Will Chair Prestigious UCLA Department

UCLA has hired Japanese-born Hitoshi Abe to head the school's Department of Architecture and Urban Design.

Jewish Symphony Takes Music Education to Classrooms

The Los Angeles Jewish Symphony holds workshops for elementary school students to introduce them to orchestra music and to teach the youngsters about the ancient culture of Spain's Jews.