Austin Cross

Host, All Things Considered and the podcast, Consider This

Contact Austin Cross

Austin Cross is the host of the early edition of All Things Considered and the podcast, Consider This.

As a toddler, Austin was placed in front of a mic by his father to deliver mock newscasts. He was a natural and has been honing his broadcast journalism skills for the last decade.

As a business producer for CBS Radio station KNX in the early 2010s, he and his hosts helped guide Southern California through an unprecedented financial crisis. His writing and production won him the Radio Television Digital News Association (RTDNA) Golden Microphone Award for “Best Business and Consumer News Reporting in 2012.

Before arriving at KPCC in 2014, Austin worked at Marketplace, producing stories for the daily program and Marketplace Weekend.

He joined KPCC first as an associate producer for Take Two in 2014.

Over the next six years, Austin created a niche for himself, tackling two of the most challenging conversations over the last five years: race and politics.

Austin produced a series of segments aimed at making the news personal: his Children Crossing series amplified the stories of immigrants brought to America at a young age.

To encourage listeners in the early days of the pandemic, his series Positivity Amid Pandemic featured words of encouragement from members of the Southern California community.

His reporting on the U.S. Census unearthed a report linking the Japanese Internment to the Census Bureau.

Austin’s reporting has been heard on NPR and KQED’s statewide program, California Report. His essays about race have been prominently featured as part of LAist’s “Race in LA” series.

When he’s not on the job, Austin enjoys writing music, cooking, and spending time with his wife, Natalie.

Stories by Austin Cross

Meet the 20-year-old racing to preserve WWII vets’ stories

Agoura Hills native Rishi Sharma may be young, but he's in a race against time. This is his story.

Militants in the Philippines: President's martial law order is Déjà vu for some expats

Reports say Islamist militants have burned buildings, taken hostages and even raised black ISIS-style flags on the country's southern island.

Trump in Israel fulfills the 'dream of generations' for some SoCal Jews

To Simon Wiesenthal Center founder Rabbi Marvin Hier, Trump's trip to the Holy Land is more than just politics — it's prophecy.

State of Affairs: Rep. McCarthy's 'jokes,' DeLeon's new video, Dems assemble in Sacramento

It's been a busy week for California politics. Here's what you might have missed.

Democrats are bullish about their ability to take back the House

The new strategy: Target several vulnerable California Republican lawmakers.

State of Affairs: Brown, budgets, battlegrounds, and CA's possible presidential contender

While most of us were busy following the fallout from the firing of the FBI director, Governor Jerry Brown put out a revised state budget that's a little more generous than his first draft.

San Francisco to provide legal defense for immigrants facing deportation

Undocumented immigrants who can't afford an attorney are forced to face the judge alone. But San Francisco's public defender is working to change that.

State of Affairs: CA's Republicans say 'yes' to health care bill

California Republicans were among some of the final holdouts. In the end, every single one would vote for the bill. So what caused them to fall in line?

The psychology behind that popular new comic from 'The Oatmeal'

Seattle-based artist Matthew Inman challenges our relationship with facts in an irreverent new comic. We broke it down with a psychologist.

No bones about it: Bray-Ali's uncloseted skeletons unlikely to help his campaign

Voters have forgiven candidates who have had affairs or late taxes, reasons one political scientist, but racist posts online are a no-go in these parts.

After the LA Riots, blacks, Korean-Americans faced different realities

International investors poured money into rebuilding Koreatown, making it wealthier than ever. But in South Los Angeles, little has changed.

State of Affairs: How California fared in President Trump's first 100 days

A bipartisan roundtable analyzes Trump's impact on the Golden State.

The itsy bitsy spider explosion coming to Southern California

With the drought officially over, experts are expecting a "bumper crop" of arachnids — especially brown widows.

State of Affairs: Sen. Feinstein's rough week, Rep. Issa's ostensible journey to the center

It's been an eventful week for politics in the Golden State.

One car per green: LA on-ramp lights turn 50

Granted, they can be frustrating, but one Caltrans engineer says your commute would be a lot harder without them.