Austin Cross

Host, All Things Considered and the podcast, Consider This

Contact Austin Cross

Austin Cross is the host of the early edition of All Things Considered and the podcast, Consider This.

As a toddler, Austin was placed in front of a mic by his father to deliver mock newscasts. He was a natural and has been honing his broadcast journalism skills for the last decade.

As a business producer for CBS Radio station KNX in the early 2010s, he and his hosts helped guide Southern California through an unprecedented financial crisis. His writing and production won him the Radio Television Digital News Association (RTDNA) Golden Microphone Award for “Best Business and Consumer News Reporting in 2012.

Before arriving at KPCC in 2014, Austin worked at Marketplace, producing stories for the daily program and Marketplace Weekend.

He joined KPCC first as an associate producer for Take Two in 2014.

Over the next six years, Austin created a niche for himself, tackling two of the most challenging conversations over the last five years: race and politics.

Austin produced a series of segments aimed at making the news personal: his Children Crossing series amplified the stories of immigrants brought to America at a young age.

To encourage listeners in the early days of the pandemic, his series Positivity Amid Pandemic featured words of encouragement from members of the Southern California community.

His reporting on the U.S. Census unearthed a report linking the Japanese Internment to the Census Bureau.

Austin’s reporting has been heard on NPR and KQED’s statewide program, California Report. His essays about race have been prominently featured as part of LAist’s “Race in LA” series.

When he’s not on the job, Austin enjoys writing music, cooking, and spending time with his wife, Natalie.

Stories by Austin Cross

Peak LA pairings: Crème brûlée doughnuts with fried chicken

Can pastries and poultry coexist? A new shop in DTLA thinks so. Take Two ventured there to see what kind of treats and tastes Astro Doughnuts and Fried Chicken has brought from Washington, D.C.

State of Affairs: The Bay takes Trump to court as sanctuary statehood looms

San Francisco hopes to block an executive order that would withhold funding from so-called sanctuary cities.

What United Airlines teaches us about social media strategy

Sometimes a weak response to controversy allows others to fill in the blanks, according to an expert in digital branding.

State of Affairs: CA lawmakers react to Syria strike, Gov. Brown scores $54b tax victory

Reactions among lawmakers were mixed; some applauded the action, while others urged phe president to consult Congress in the future.

SoCal Trump supporter: US can intervene in Syria and still keep 'America First'

President Trump flipped in his stance on Syria, but one local proponent says the U.S. needed to send a message to the "butchers and bullies" of the world.

Why did the LA Times do that 6-part editorial on President Trump?

Though the essays have received several shares, reader response has been mixed.

The breakdown: What the primary for Becerra's seat reveals about CA Dems

Some speculated that the race could offer hints about the direction of the Democratic Party. Hint: Progressives are definitely in the driver's seat.

America's complicated relationship with outspoken black women

Borne of centuries of oppression, strong women are a staple of African American culture.

State of Affairs: Reps. Nunes and Schiff spar, Gov. Brown pushes gas tax

Today on State of Affairs:

Sen. Kamala Harris on health care, Russian interference and more

Take Two's A Martinez spoke with California Senator Kamala Harris about how she's taking on the big issues in Washington DC.

California's Schiff, Nunes lead nation's most-watched investigation

Their backgrounds couldn't be more different. Now, the two California lawmakers must work through a high-stakes probe. Meet the Intelligence Committee's leading men.

State of Affairs: Lawmakers react to Trump budget proposal and the Doggfather gets political

Political news from the Golden State.

San Bernardino Police turn to tech to help prevent homicides

Murder rates in San Bernardino are some of the highest in the nation. Now, the same program that helped drop crime rates in Oakland is coming to the Inland Empire.

Why don't more girls study STEM in college?

Non-profits in the state and around the country have done a lot to get more young girls interested in these topics, but by college, enthusiasm fades.

State of Affairs: GOP lawmakers react to proposed Obamacare replacement

Take Two's weekly look at politics in the Golden State.