John Horn

Host, The Frame

Contact John Horn

John Horn is the host of The Frame. He previously was a staff writer at the Los Angeles Times, where he covered the film business for more than a decade. Before joining The Times, Horn was a senior writer at Newsweek magazine, a senior editor at Premiere magazine, an entertainment reporter for The Associated Press and a television reporter for the Orange County Register. He is an honors graduate of the University of California, Berkeley, with a degree in Dramatic Arts. He is a former member of the vestry at All Saints Church and a former member of the boards of the National Arts Journalism Program and Union Station Homeless Services.

Stories by John Horn

How the director of 'The Fits' made a quiet movie that says a lot

For her movie about a young girl’s coming of age, Anna Rose Holmer cast a girls dance troupe whose members had never acted in a movie.

Who has Hollywood's leading role in California's presidential primary?

While Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders vie for support in the heavily Democratic industry, Republicans largely take a more circumspect approach with Donald Trump.

What made Bryan Cranston go from police work to acting? Girls.

In his life after “Breaking Bad,” Bryan Cranston is busier than ever. He reflects on a life in acting, what he learned from his dad's acting career and how he advi

Greg Kalleres' play, 'Honky,' targets racism in advertising and in our culture at-large

The play revolves around an advertising copywriter who’s afraid a commercial that he wrote led to a fatal encounter between two black teens over a pair of sneakers.

Netflix is the exclusive home to Disney films starting in September

The streaming service will have the exclusive rights to stream Marvel, Pixar, Lucasfilm and Walt Disney Animation Studios titles released in 2016 and onward.

In 'Song of Lahore,' Pakistani musicians fight social stigma to play the music they love

The new documentary "Song of Lahore" tells how traditional Pakistani musicians found a new audience through YouTube after decades of local suppression.

'The Muppets,' 'Castle,' among TV shows canceled ahead of 2016 Upfronts

A bevy of shows have been canceled as TV networks prepare to woo advertisers at a series of presentations in New York next week

Trump is more Schwarzenegger than Al Franken on campaign trail

Trump forged a celebrity character on "The Apprentice," and the way he's using it on the campaign trail is strikingly similar to what Schwarzenegger did with his "Terminator" character.

Amazon goes head-to-head with YouTube with a video service

Bloomberg News technology reporter Spencer Soper explains how Amazon will now allow people to upload videos to its site, putting it in direct competition with YouTube

Why consumers are the real losers in the Ticketmaster lawsuit

The event ticketing company agreed to settle for $45 million after it overcharged customers on ticket fees — but concert fans won't get much back.

Alan Mandell and Barry McGovern get up close and personal with Samuel Beckett

The actors play the leads in a current production of "Endgame," which continues their deep connection to the playwright and his work.

Youtube moves to break into the cord-cutting business

At the company's NewFronts presentation in New York, the company's CEO boasted about the website's enormous user base and continued to court advertisers.

Beyoncé and Radiohead are changing the way albums are released

Artists are increasingly using social media and multimedia experiences to generate excitement for their new releases. It's a trend you can expect to see more.

Tracy Scott and the invisible art of script supervision

She worked on some of the most well-received movies of the past few years. Following her recent death, her celebrated colleagues explain why having a gifted script supervisor is invaluable.

Tony-nominated 'The Humans' gets real about family

Nominated for six Tony awards, "The Humans" is a funny but serious look into what binds a family together — and what tears it apart.