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Environment & Science

California Drought News: Hope is not a plan, except in the World Cup — the truth about El Niño



The U.S. Men's National Team takes on Ghana today. It's okay to hope for a win in the World Cup, but two U.C. Davis researchers say it's not a good idea to bank on hope that an El Niño gets California out of drought.
The U.S. Men's National Team takes on Ghana today. It's okay to hope for a win in the World Cup, but two U.C. Davis researchers say it's not a good idea to bank on hope that an El Niño gets California out of drought.
JOSH EDELSON/AFP/Getty Images

Monday's news finds it sort of ironic that we're talking drought here while torrential rain threatens the United States-Ghana World Cup match. Starts at 3 p.m. Pacific, y'all. Cheer for the USMNT while the hope is still alive in the Group of Death. On to the roundup.

In all, there’s a 71 percent chance that next year will be Below Normal or drier and only a 29 percent chance of experiencing an Above Normal or Wet year. (California WaterBlog)

The message: it might rain this winter, it might not, but to borrow some words from Top Gun, California's ego may be writing checks its body can't cash. We're still drawing down groundwater faster than we should, argue the authors. Hope is not a plan.

"Today's Congress, though, is full of folks who stubbornly and automatically reject the scientific evidence about climate change," Obama told graduates from the University of California, Irvine in Anaheim. "They'll tell you it's a hoax, or a fad." Many GOP members have said that they can't talk about climate change because they aren't scientists. But Obama wasn't satisfied with this logic, saying, "Let me translate. What that means is, 'I accept that manmade climate change is real, but if I admit it, I'll be run out of town by a radical fringe that thinks climate science is a liberal plot.'" He added, "I'm not a scientist either, but we've got some good ones at NASA." (PolicyMic)
In Tulare County, 29.7 percent of residents live below the federal poverty line — making it the most impoverished county in the state and among the highest poverty rates in the nation. The drought has hit Tulare County's poor particularly hard, especially families like 80-year-old Carmen and Al Almanza. The retired couple were surprised in early April when water simply stopped coming out of their faucet.
They rely on their son, who brings a trash can filled with water to their home three times a week, and grandchildren, who bring them bottled water for drinking. (Deseret News)
Home developers tend to do only what's asked of them, Freed said. "They're meeting building codes, and while it's true that California has the greenest and stringent codes in the country, it's still not what's needed in terms of saving water."

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