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Friday Favorites: 4 health stories you might've missed



No, you still can't eat this if you have to watch your cholesterol, even if the government does drop its longstanding cautions about eating cholesterol-heavy foods.
No, you still can't eat this if you have to watch your cholesterol, even if the government does drop its longstanding cautions about eating cholesterol-heavy foods.
April Moore-Harris via Flickr

As Valentine's Day approaches, here's an AirTalk segment about heart health – plus three more health-related stories from KPCC – that you might have missed this week.

Top US nutrition panel to drop warnings about cholesterol bogeyman

The country's top dietary advisory panel - the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee - reportedly is set to drop long-standing cautions about eating cholesterol-heavy foods, according to The Washington Post, as discussed on KPCC’s AirTalk.

The Washington Post's Wonk Blog reports:

The finding follows an evolution of thinking among many nutritionists who now believe that, for healthy adults, eating foods high in cholesterol may not significantly affect the level of cholesterol in the blood or increase the risk of heart disease.

The greater danger in this regard, these experts believe, lies not in products such as eggs, shrimp or lobster, which are high in cholesterol, but in too many servings of foods heavy with saturated fats, such as fatty meats, whole milk, and butter.

Impatient: We answer your questions about measles and vaccines

As part of a new health segment on Take Two, I joined host Alex Cohen to answer audience questions about measles.

If you have questions about measles – or another question about navigating the health system – please let me know!

Google aims to cure misleading medical searches

Speaking of health questions…on Tuesday I reported on a new effort by Google to dramatically improve the quality of its health-related search results.

The company started rolling it out this week: Now, when you look up a symptom or disease, you'll see an expanded box, with information about typical symptoms, treatment, and more - all reviewed by a team of doctors at Google and the Mayo Clinic.

 I looked up… wait for it… measles! ...and thought the information box was pretty cool.

How to tell loved ones their pipe dreams are unhealthy

We're approaching a holiday weekend and this is Los Angeles, so you're bound to have a conversation over the next couple of days with someone who's making it – or not.

AirTalk featured career coach Marty Nemko, who said people should avoid Pollyanna-ish cheerleading if someone's dreams don't seem to be reality-based. 

What's the best way to talk about this touchy subject? Check out this AirTalk program for tips and advice.

Which health stories are you reading and talking about this week? E-mail us at Impatient@scpr.org or ping me on Twitter at @rebeccaplevin.