Multi-American | How immigrants are redefining 'American' in Southern California

In immigration news: Stepped-up deportation, Honduras' First Lady, family reunions gone awry



Honduran First Lady Ana Rosalinda de Hernandez said she will come to the US to retrieve her country's children. Here, she is at the swearing-in of her husband Pres. Juan Orlando Hernandez.
Honduran First Lady Ana Rosalinda de Hernandez said she will come to the US to retrieve her country's children. Here, she is at the swearing-in of her husband Pres. Juan Orlando Hernandez.
Arnulfo Franco/AP

U.S. Plans to Step Up Detention and Deportation of Migrants - New York Times The Obama administration is trying to stem the tide of immigrants crossing the border by opening more detention facilities and speeding up deportations.  According to the story, the administration is acknowledging that misinformation about its border policies — that the US offers a kind of entry permit — may have spurred the influx. From the story: "Migrants unfamiliar with the American system have been confusing the notice to appear in court, the immigration equivalent of an indictment, with a permit to stay in the United States."

White House: Election boosts immigration - The Hill  Presidential adviser Valerie Jarrett said Friday that the new House leadership team formed since Eric Cantor's primary defeat will be good for immigration reform. California Rep. Kevin McCarthy has since been elected to be Cantor's replacement as House Majority Leader.  Jarrett also has met with business leaders such as News Corp. chairman Rupert Murdoch in recent days and said  “nobody has said to me they thought his defeat was because of immigration reform."  

Honduras’ First Lady Says She Will Collect Her Country's Child Border-Crashers - Newsweek As part of an effort by the Honduran government to repatriate Honduran youths who've illegally crossed into the US, the country's First Lady plans to get personally involved. She's scheduled to fly to the US on Sunday and has asked the children's parents to "drop off identifying documents like birth certificates and photographs of their departed children at nearby government offices so the commission can assemble files on each of the minors." But a law expert said the First Lady would not be able to legally take the children away from their parents.

 As more unaccompanied minors arrive, some family reunions have posed problems - Southern California Public Radio It's been well-reported that unaccompanied minors make an often-treacherous trip to the US, with the help of smugglers. But what happens once they cross the border and are reunited with the family they're trying to rejoin? It's not always a happy ending. This story chronicles the stateside journey Stephanny, 16, went on after arriving in Los Angeles last March. She was placed with her mother whom she hadn't since she was 5, but soon discovered her parent struggled with schizophrenia, and had married an alcoholic, who would attempt to molest Stephanny. Stories like hers have led to questions about how the influx of unaccompanied minors is putting strains on federal workers charged with screening the relatives to whom the children are being released.