Multi-American | How immigrants are redefining 'American' in Southern California

In immigration news: An 'amnesty' fact check, Latino and Asian American voters, immigration in a GOP Senate, more



President Obama has discussed taking executive action on immigration after the election, in light of the legislative stalemate this year in Congress. But he has not promised legal status to the 11 million immigrants without legal status estimated to be living in the United States.
President Obama has discussed taking executive action on immigration after the election, in light of the legislative stalemate this year in Congress. But he has not promised legal status to the 11 million immigrants without legal status estimated to be living in the United States.
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Did Obama promise ‘amnesty’ to 11 million undocumented immigrants after the election? - Washington Post A fact check concludes that no, although he has talked about taking action on immigration, President Obama has not made such a pledge: "While Obama has said he will take executive action, he’s never said it would result in 'amnesty' for that many people. Indeed, 'amnesty,' or something like it, requires an act of Congress. On top of that, it’s highly unlikely that executive action would affect all 11 million undocumented immigrants."

Romney: A GOP Senate to pass immigration, trade - Politico In a televised interview Sunday, 2012 Republican presidential nominee and ex-Massachusetts governor Mitt Romney suggested that a Republican Congress could get a more conservative immigration bill passed and signed: “You’re going to see a provision, first of all, to secure the border," Romney said. "Second of all, to deal with those who come here illegally. And third, to make sure our immigration policies are more open and transparent… That’s going to happen."

Latino Voters' Wrenching Choice -The Atlantic With many disappointed over how the Obama administration has so far handled immigration, it's anticipated that some Latino voters could sit out the election. From the story: "Abandoned by Democrats and shunned by Republicans (many of whom have exploited anti-immigrant sentiment as an election-year wedge), should they stay home to punish the politicians who disregarded them? Or should they show up and vote for Democrats anyway, rewarding the undeserving in order to demonstrate their electoral clout?"

New national battleground: The Asian vote -Politico On continuing efforts by political organizers to engage and win over Asian American voters. From the story: "Spurred by President Barack Obama’s landslide victory among Asian-American voters in 2012 and new government data showing Asians outstripping Latinos as the fastest-growing immigrant population, prominent elected officials on both sides of the aisle have called for a stepped-up focus on Americans of Asian descent."

What happened to the debate over immigration reform?- Mashable From the story: "In July of this year, a Gallup poll reported that one in six Americans thought immigration was the most important problem facing the United States. Yet, in the lead-up to the 2014 midterm elections, candidates have barely brought immigration reform to the debate table." Campaign talk has focused on issues like jobs and healthcare reform, "as well as issues of the moment, including how to contain Ebola and combat Islamic State extremists."