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In immigration news: Executive action details, GOP backlash, a 'disproportionate' effect in California, more



A boys shows a U.S. flag as President Barack Obama speaks on immigration at the Chamizal National Memorial on May 10, 2011 in El Paso, Texas. It's expected that President Obama's executive action plan, to be announced Thursday, will offer relief from deportation to certain groups of immigrants, such as the parents of U.S. citizens.
A boys shows a U.S. flag as President Barack Obama speaks on immigration at the Chamizal National Memorial on May 10, 2011 in El Paso, Texas. It's expected that President Obama's executive action plan, to be announced Thursday, will offer relief from deportation to certain groups of immigrants, such as the parents of U.S. citizens.
JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images

Obama’s immigration plan will halt deportations for 3.7 million - Washington Post In his immigration address planned for this evening, President Obama is "expected to say he will stop deportations for a certain group of illegal immigrants: parents whose children are already U.S. citizens or legal permanent residents. The protection would only apply to parents who have lived in the United States for five years or more. There are about 3.7 million illegal immigrants who meet that criteria, according to a report from the Migration Policy Institute."

Everything You Need to Know About Obama's Immigration Announcement - ABC News From the story: "Who Gets Relief? 4.1 million undocumented parents and families of U.S. citizens who have been in country more than 5 years with no criminal record. 300,000 undocumented immigrants who came to the U.S. illegally as children, so-called Dreamers, will be newly eligible for the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program. Current age limits for the program will be dropped, sources say. 400,000 highly-skilled workers will be eligible for visas."

In California, executive action on immigration could have 'disproportionate' impact - Southern California Public Radio If President Obama's anticipated deportation relief applies to immigrants who have been in the United States long-term, as is expected, then California could see long lines of applicants: An estimated 22 percent of California's immigrants without legal status have lived in the United States for 20 years or more. More than half have lived in the U.S. for 10 years or more, and a whopping 83 percent have lived in the country over five years.

G.O.P. Promises to Swiftly Counter Obama’s Immigration Moves - New York Times With many conservative lawmakers upset over President Obama acting solo on immigration, Republican leaders are "sharply divided about whether to shut down the government or seek Mr. Obama’s impeachment in an effort to stop the executive actions from moving forward. Some conservatives are pushing to do one or the other, while other Republicans have urged the party to avoid going down either of those routes."

The legal battle over Obama's immigration plan - CNN What are the legal limits that govern how far President Obama can go on immigration without Congress? From the story: "The law...may be as murky as the immigration system itself. 'The issue is, if the president's actions effectively nullify federal law, then they are unconstitutional,' said Alex Nowrasteh, immigration policy analyst at the Cato Institute. 'But if his actions merely channel enforcement resources to other areas covered under the law then it is within his discretion to do so.'"

Immigrants face major hurdles in signing up to new Obama plan - Reuters Once the floodgates open for people to apply for deportation relief, as is expected, "immigration advocacy groups say they don't have sufficient resources to provide legal services to their existing clients, never mind the millions of potential new ones. Obama's proposal is not expected to provide for federal funding for attorneys to guide immigrants through the process."