Multi-American | How immigrants are redefining 'American' in Southern California

In immigration news: New California laws, lessons of DACA, executive action details, more



Among the immigration-related laws taking effect in California in 2015 is one that will allow immigrants eligible for driver's licenses under AB 60 to buy low-cost auto insurance. Immigrants without legal status may begin applying for the special licenses through the Department of Motor Vehicles starting Jan. 2.
Among the immigration-related laws taking effect in California in 2015 is one that will allow immigrants eligible for driver's licenses under AB 60 to buy low-cost auto insurance. Immigrants without legal status may begin applying for the special licenses through the Department of Motor Vehicles starting Jan. 2.
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New laws in 2015 to benefit undocumented immigrants - Orange County Register Several new California laws taking effect this coming year will benefit immigrants without legal status, including one that will allow them to buy low-cost auto insurance if they are eligible for a special driver's license under the law known as AB 60. Other new laws include one that lets immigrant students obtain more financial aid for college, and another that provides funding for legal counsel to represent unaccompanied migrant youths.

Immigration action 2.0: Lessons learned from DACA - MSNBC More than 580,000 young immigrants have received temporary legal status under the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrival (DACA) program, which rolled out on 2012. The program is a small-scale version of what's to come as the White House rolls out its new immigration plan next year. From the story: "...the number of total applicants pales in comparison to the estimated 5 million people who could potentially benefit from the latest round of executive measures."

How Obama's immigration plan is expected to roll out - Los Angeles Times How many immigrants are expected to be eligible, whether there is a path to citizenship (there isn't) and a recap of other aspects of President Obama's executive action plan. The plan will allow as many as 5 million immigrants to apply for temporary relief from deportation, including people who arrived as minors, and parents of U.S. citizens and legal residents who have lived in the country at least five years.

US Immigration Reform Appears Unlikely in 2015 - Voice of America With conservative leaders at odds with the White House over President Obama's recent executive order on immigration, the issue of immigration reform has become increasingly divisive. From the story: "Analysts say it may still be possible for the Republican-controlled Congress and President Obama to achieve agreement on at least some parts of immigration reform next year, but that full reform is more likely to be delayed until after the 2016 presidential election."