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Garcetti, other mayors join lawsuit in defense of Obama immigration plan



Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti at KPCC's Crawford Family Forum in October. Garcetti and New York Mayor Bill de Blasio are leading a coalition of more than two dozen mayors in support of President Obama's recent immigration order; on Monday, the coalition filed a brief in support of the order in Texas vs. United States, a multi-state lawsuit that aims to block the order from taking effect.
Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti at KPCC's Crawford Family Forum in October. Garcetti and New York Mayor Bill de Blasio are leading a coalition of more than two dozen mayors in support of President Obama's recent immigration order; on Monday, the coalition filed a brief in support of the order in Texas vs. United States, a multi-state lawsuit that aims to block the order from taking effect.
Grant Slater/KPCC

Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti is one of a long list of mayors who have signed on to an amicus brief supporting President Obama's executive order on immigration.

The brief was filed Monday in Texas v. United States, a federal lawsuit filed in December with the intent of stopping the recent order from taking effect.

Garcetti and New York Mayor Bill de Blasio organized the coalition of city leaders, which includes Mayors Ed Lee of San Francisco, Rahm Emanuel of Chicago, Muriel Bowser of Washington, D.C. and more than two dozen others.

Obama's executive order, signed in November, would temporarily protect millions of immigrants from deportation. Those who would qualify for a three-year reprieve and a work permit include certain immigrants who arrived as minors, and parents of U.S. citizens and legal residents who have spent at least five years in the United States.

The amicus brief from the mayors argues that these provisions "will fuel economic growth in cities across the country, increase public safety and public engagement, and facilitate the full integration of immigrant residents by promoting family unity and limiting family separation. These positive impacts are possible because Executive Action will permit undocumented immigrants to better reach their potential and contribute to their communities."

Garcetti said in an emailed statement: "Moving forward with these reforms is a human and economic imperative, and we're united to make sure this important policy moves forward."

Texas v. United States is pending in U.S. District Court in Texas; more than two dozen states have signed on as plaintiffs, most recently Nevada and Tennessee. The states argue that the lawsuit is less about immigration than the rule of law and executive overreach. The Obama administration has countered that the president acted within his authority.