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In immigration news: Homeland Security funding, canceled court hearings, Asian Americans slower to apply for DACA, more



One of the biggest federal budget fights will be over funding the Department of Homeland Security, whose funding is due to expire at the end of this month. The battle is part of the political backlash to President Obama's executive immigration order, which some GOP lawmakers have tried to stop by tying it to DHS funding.
One of the biggest federal budget fights will be over funding the Department of Homeland Security, whose funding is due to expire at the end of this month. The battle is part of the political backlash to President Obama's executive immigration order, which some GOP lawmakers have tried to stop by tying it to DHS funding.
FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images

Homeland Security site of looming fund fight - CNN One of the biggest budget fights will be over funding the Department of Homeland Security, as GOP lawmakers have tried to tie funding to President Obama's executive immigration order. From the story: "The Homeland Security Department's funding is due to expire Feb. 27, a date chosen by Republicans in December, as they worked out a deal to keep the rest of the government up and running through much of 2015. Republicans are using this deadline as leverage to push the President on immigration, in the wake of what they see as overreach by the President for his executive orders last year."

Thousands in limbo as overloaded immigration courts cancel hearings - Associated Press More on how thousands of people have had their immigration court hearings canceled and cases delayed for years, some until 2019. From the story: "The increase in cancellations began late last summer after the Justice Department prioritized the tens of thousands of Central American migrants crossing the U.S.-Mexico border, most of them mothers with children and unaccompanied minors."

Asians slower to seek immigration protection - Associated Press Young Asian Americans without legal status have not signed up for temporary protection under the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program to the degree expected. From the story: "Many advocates have blamed the paltry turnout among young Asian immigrants for the administration's 2012 program on the stigma of being in the country illegally in their communities, where many feel lacking proper immigration papers is culturally shunned." Advocates fear the same will hold true as the Obama administration rolls out its new immigration plan.

Safety for immigrant victims put on hold by U-visa delay - Los Angeles Times The U visa is intended for immigrants who are victims of crimes, allowing them to remain legally in the U.S. But requests for these visas have risen in recent years, forcing victims to wait. From the story: "Demand for the program has far outpaced a 10,000-per-year cap on the visas set by Congress, with just over 26,000 applications filed last fiscal year. There's even a wait to get on the waiting list: U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, which processes the applications in the order they were filed, hasn't evaluated any application submitted after December 2013."