Multi-American | How immigrants are redefining 'American' in Southern California

In immigration news: A long wait for some childhood arrivals, Homeland Security funding, more



Immigrants who arrived in the U.S. as minors but were too old to qualify for deferred action in 2012 will soon be able to seek temporary immigration relief. They include people like Jesus Cortez, who arrived in the U.S. illegally when he was nine years old. He's earned a master's degree, but has been working as a gardener since he was in his teens.
Immigrants who arrived in the U.S. as minors but were too old to qualify for deferred action in 2012 will soon be able to seek temporary immigration relief. They include people like Jesus Cortez, who arrived in the U.S. illegally when he was nine years old. He's earned a master's degree, but has been working as a gardener since he was in his teens.
Leslie Berestein Rojas/KPCC

Republicans at odds over immigration - The Hill On the ongoing fight over a House bill that would fund the Department of Homeland Security, but seeks to undo the Obama administration's executive immigration plan. From the story: "Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) said Tuesday the House will have to pass a new bill because the Senate can’t pass the House’s initial legislation, which would overturn President Obama’s executive actions on immigration shielding millions from deportation." Homeland Security is funded only through Feb. 27.

For some childhood arrivals, a long wait for legal status - Southern California Public Radio Next week, immigrants who arrived in the U.S. as minors but didn't qualify for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals will be able to apply for temporary immigration relief. Some failed to qualify in 2012 because they were over the cutoff age of 30. Among these are U.S.-educated people who have been working beneath their skill and educational legal.

West Hollywood family split apart due to 'immigration paperwork foul-up' - ABC 7 A Russian American family is blaming a "clerical error" for the detention of Anya Bondareva, a mother of five. She was detained after trying to return to the U.S. via San Diego from a trip to Mexico. Her husband says that he'd hired an immigration consultant to process her paperwork, but that all she had received was a conditional green card.

Push to repeal New Mexico's law allowing immigrants to drive gains momentum - Associated Press On the movement to do away with driver's licenses for unauthorized immigrants in New Mexico: "..legislation to stop the state's practice is gaining traction despite a trend sweeping through several states to offer driving privileges to everyone regardless of their status. Fresh off a political power shift, the GOP-led House of Representatives is poised to pass a measure repealing a 2003 law that made New Mexico one of the first states to offer licenses to immigrants regardless of status."