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In immigration news: The executive action ruling, immigrants told to keep preparing, Homeland Security funding, more



A three-year-old girl joins a news conference in support of the Obama administration's immigration plan in Denver, Colorado on Tuesday, Feb. 17. The White House has promised an appeal after a federal judge in Texas temporarily blocked President Barack Obama's executive action on immigration.
A three-year-old girl joins a news conference in support of the Obama administration's immigration plan in Denver, Colorado on Tuesday, Feb. 17. The White House has promised an appeal after a federal judge in Texas temporarily blocked President Barack Obama's executive action on immigration.
David Zalubowski/AP

What the immigration ruling means - CNN On the ruling by U.S. District Court Judge Andrew S. Hanen in Texas earlier this week, which temporarily blocks President's Obama's immigration order. The judge ruled on a multi-state lawsuit initiated by Texas. From the story: "Hanen did not rule on the constitutional merits of the case challenged by Texas and 26 other states. But he said that Texas was able to demonstrate an injury sufficient to give it standing to sue. He also said that the administration had likely failed to comply with procedures for the way federal agencies can establish regulations."

Texas judge's immigration rebuke may be hard to challenge - Reuters From the story: "President Barack Obama's administration faces a difficult and possibly lengthy legal battle to overturn a Texas court ruling that blocked his landmark immigration overhaul, since the judge based his decision on an obscure and unsettled area of administrative law, lawyers said." In his ruling, the judge "faulted Obama for not giving public notice of his plans," saying it was a violation of a 1946 law called the Administrative Procedure Act.

Immigration Standoff May End With A Congressional Punt - Huffington Post The court ruling that has temporarily halted President Obama's immigration plan isn't publicly changing the debate in Congress over funding the Department of Homeland Security, at least so far. From the story: "With just 10 days before DHS funding runs out, the likelihood of a mini-shutdown seemed high on Tuesday. The congressional recalcitrance wasn't abating, and most lawmakers were home in their districts. Monday night's decision by a U.S. district judge in Texas appeared not to have altered the odds."

Advocates urge immigrants not to be deterred by ruling blocking Obama plan - Los Angeles Times Applicants for an expanded version of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals were to begin signing up for temporary immigration relief on Wednesday, before President Obama's plan was put on hold by a federal judge's ruling. Immigrant advocates are hoping it's a temporary setback and are advising hopeful applicants to continue getting their paperwork ready. The Obama administration plans to appeal the court decision.