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LA County supervisors want to create 'deferred action task force'



Three Los Angeles County Supervisors want to create what they call a “deferred action task force” that would help implement President Obama's immigration plan. The idea would be for county departments to work together to assist immigrants with information, obtaining necessary documents and other services. Obama's executive order is temporary on hold following a court ruling last week; the administration is appealing the decision.
Three Los Angeles County Supervisors want to create what they call a “deferred action task force” that would help implement President Obama's immigration plan. The idea would be for county departments to work together to assist immigrants with information, obtaining necessary documents and other services. Obama's executive order is temporary on hold following a court ruling last week; the administration is appealing the decision.
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Update, 2:25 p.m. The L.A. County Board of Supervisors has voted 4-1 in favor of creating a task force to help implement the Obama administration's immigration plan, according to staff with the office of Supervisor Hilda Solis.

Three Los Angeles County Supervisors plan to introduce a measure today that would create a new immigration task force. The idea would be for county departments to work together for “optimal implementation” of President Obama’s executive immigration order, which for now is hung up in court.
 
Supervisors Hilda Solis, Shiela Kuehl and Mark Ridley-Thomas want to create what they call a “deferred action task force.” Departments like Consumer Affairs, the Registrar-Recorder and others would be directed to assist immigrants with information and whatever else they would need to apply for relief.

Obama's order would let millions of immigrants without legal status who either arrived as minors or are the parents of U.S. citizens and legal residents apply for temporary legal status. They would also be able obtain to work permits. An estimated 466,000 eligible immigrants are thought to live in L.A. county.

"I'm very excited about bringing this forward, it's something that probably should have been done early on," said Solis, who said there are more than 100,000 residents in her district who could qualify.

Solis said one important service the county can provide is helping people find the documents they'd need in order to apply.

"For those people that are looking for birth certificates, marriage certificates...things of that nature to establish their claim to residency here, that can be provided by the county," she said,

Solis said she didn't have a price tag for the task force, but added that some services, like the retrieval of documents, would fund themselves because "all of those would have attached fees to them."

A UCLA report on the economic advantages of Obama's plan will be released at today's Board of Supervisors Meeting.

According to UCLA's North American Integration and Development Center, the implementation of executive action could lead to job growth and a boost to the county's tax base: an estimated $1.6 billion in higher wages for immigrants who land better jobs thanks to new work permits; the creation of 38,500 additional jobs due to wage growth; and $1.13 billion in tax revenues.

Other research has found differently, though. An older report from the Public Policy Institute of California concluded that at least in the short run, the newly legalized don't necessarily earn more. It also concluded there is "little evidence to support the view that such a step would have significant effects on the broader economy, particularly on tax revenues or public assistance programs."

Work permits under Obama's plan would be good for three years at a time.

In the meantime, there is one catch: Obama’s plan is in limbo. A federal judge in Texas put it on hold last week, ruling on a lawsuit filed by 26 states in opposition to the executive order. The Obama administration is appealing the decision.

Solis says she's confident the setback is only temporary.

“This is stuck in the court process, but I believe the president has good standing on moving forward with this," she said. "So we need to be ready."

A vote on the task force measure is expected today.

This story has been updated.